Tag: Health Claims

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They say hindsight is 20/20, but what about foresight? We’re not ones to prognosticate, but a look at notable FTC cases and initiatives from the past year suggests some topics likely to be top of mind in months to come. Here is a non-exhaustive list of issues in our 2019 rearview...
Defendants allegedly violated 2018 final order requiring scientific evidence for disease claims
The Federal Trade Commission is mailing 1,951 refund checks totaling over $321,000 to consumers who bought supposed weight-loss products marketed by LeanSpa, LLC. This is the second round of checks in this matter.
The sellers of Synovia claimed their dietary supplement “paves the pot holes” in joints damaged by arthritis. But an FTC lawsuit alleges the primary pot holes were in the company’s purported proof, which left consumers streamrollered by false and deceptive advertising claims.
The marketers of a dietary supplement called Synovia agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges by halting the deceptive tactics they allegedly used to mislead consumers into thinking Synovia could treat arthritis and alleviate joint pain.
The Federal Trade Commission is mailing 79,771 refund checks totaling over $1.8 million to consumers who signed up for “risk-free” trial offers for skin care products, but were enrolled in negative option programs with recurring monthly charges.
In tribute to the baseball season that’s just ended, we’ll start this blog post about an alleged pyramid scheme and supposed miraculous dietary supplements with the words of the great Yogi Berra: “It's like déjà vu all over again.”
Continuing its work to protect older Americans from fraud, the Federal Trade Commission sued a publisher called Agora Financial, LLC, alleging that it tricks seniors into buying books, newsletters, and other publications that falsely promise a cure for type 2 diabetes or promote a phony plan to...
Aloe and cranberry: a useful plant and a nutritious fruit. But are they clinically proven alone or in combination to treat diabetes, ulcerative colitis, high cholesterol, and a list of other serious medical conditions that afflict Boomer Consumers? According to the FTC, those are just...
The FTC sued a publisher called Agora Financial, LLC, alleging that it tricks seniors into buying books, newsletters, and other publications that falsely promise a cure for type 2 diabetes or promote a phony plan to help them cash in on a government-affiliated check program.
The Federal Trade Commission announced a joint warning letter issued with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to Rooted Apothecary, LLC for selling products containing cannabidiol (CBD) online with potentially unsubstantiated claims that the products can treat autism, attention-deficit/...
The Boca Raton, Florida-based marketers and sellers of two Aloe vera-based supplements have agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that they deceived consumers with false and unsupported claims that two products, TrueAloe and AloeCran, were effective treatments for a range of conditions...
You’ve probably seen them on TV: announcements with prominent warnings about FDA actions involving certain prescription drugs or medical devices. But they aren’t official health and safety recalls or alerts from the Food and Drug Administration. They’re something else – and FTC staff...
The Federal Trade Commission staff has sent letters to seven legal practitioners and lead generators expressing concerns that some television advertisements that solicit clients for personal injury lawsuits against drug manufacturers may be deceptive or unfair under the FTC Act. The FTC is not...
Companies and consumers are talking in a different way these days about cannabidiol (CBD), a chemical compound derived from the cannabis plant. But even as the conversation changes, one thing remains the same. Before making claims about purported health effects of CBD products,...
As part of its regular monitoring of health-related advertising claims, the Federal Trade Commission today sent warning letters to three companies that sell oils, tinctures, capsules, “gummies,” and creams containing cannabidiol (CBD), a chemical compound derived from the cannabis plant. The...

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