Tag: Health Claims

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The developers and marketers of the LearningRx “brain training” programs have agreed to stop making a range of false and unsubstantiated claims and pay $200,000 under a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission.
Seeing is believing. And last week, the FTC reminded eye doctors – in writing – about their legal responsibilities under the agency’s Eyeglass Rule. The rule requires you to provide a copy of the prescription to the patient at the end of the eye exam, even if the patient doesn’t...
Marketers of green coffee bean extract weight-loss supplements, male enhancement products, and skin care products will forfeit assets totaling approximately $9.2 million, and have already turned over a Ferrari to settle the Federal Trade Commission’s court action brought against them in October...
Marketers have been watching the FTC’s challenge to POM Wonderful’s ad claims with interest. Last year, the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled that the company deceptively advertised that the products could treat, prevent, or reduce the risk of heart disease,...
Federal Trade Commission Chairwoman Edith Ramirez issued the following statement in response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s denial today of POM Wonderful’s petition for a writ of certiorari. The Court declined to review the D.C. Circuit’s ruling upholding a Commission decision that found POM and its...
“Slash your risk of cancer” – by using a tanning bed? That claim caught our attention, too. A settlement with Dr. Joseph Mercola and two Illinois-based companies includes $5.3 million in refunds for people who bought Mercola’s indoor tanning systems. The case also offers a reminder...
The Illinois-based marketers of Mercola-brand indoor tanning systems will pay refunds to consumers and will be permanently banned from marketing or selling indoor tanning systems, under a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission.
If companies market their products as “all natural” or “100% natural,” consumers have a right to take them at their word. That’s the message of four proposed FTC settlements and one just-issued administrative complaint challenging the allegedly deceptive use of those phrases in ads...
Cuatro compañías que comercializan en internet para el cuidado de la piel, champús y protectores solares han aceptado resolver los cargos presentados por la Comisión Federal de Comercio (FTC, por su sigla en inglés) por declarar falsamente que dichos productos son “totalmente naturales” o “100%...
Four companies that market skin care products, shampoos, and sunscreens online have agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that they falsely claimed that their products are “all natural” or “100% natural,” despite the fact that they contain synthetic ingredients. The Commission has...
Today, we’re turning the table on some healthcare professionals. Don’t worry. We’re not asking an anesthesiologist to count back from ten, or even telling an ENT to say “ah.” We’re offering an eye exam for eye doctors:
If you’re in the process of developing a health-related mobile app, what tools are essential to your success? The answer, according to some entrepreneurs, is innovative code, a great marketing plan, and the number of a take-out that delivers until 2AM. But have you given much thought...
It’s a phrase you see every now and then in announcements about FTC settlements: “The order includes a $___  judgment, which has been partially suspended based on the defendants’ inability to pay.” What happens if it turns out the defendants weren’t telling the truth about their...
As a result of a federal court ruling, the Federal Trade Commission may attempt to collect up to $3.2 million from marketers who lied about their finances to the FTC when they agreed to settle deceptive advertising charges in 2014.

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