Data Security

Many companies keep sensitive personal information about customers or employees in their files or on their network. Having a sound security plan in place to collect only what you need, keep it safe, and dispose of it securely can help you meet your legal obligations to protect that sensitive data. The FTC has free resources for businesses of any size.

Guidance

For debt buyers and sellers, keeping sensitive information secure should be business as usual. The FTC has seven tips for members of the industry to help reduce the risk of unauthorized disclosure.
Advice for businesses about building security into products connected to the Internet of Things, including proper authentication, reasonable security measures, and carefully considered default settings.
Guidance for business on complying with the FTC’s Health Breach Notification Rule. Who’s covered by the Rule and what companies must do if they experience a breach of personal health records.
Does your company keep sensitive data — Social Security numbers, credit reports, account numbers, health records, or business secrets? If so, then you’ve probably instituted safeguards to protect that information. Your information security plans also should cover the digital copiers your company uses.
Once your business is finished with sensitive information derived from consumer reports, what happens to it then? Under the Disposal Rule, your company must take steps to dispose of it securely.
Under the FTC's Health Breach Notification Rule, companies that have had a security breach must: 1. Notify everyone whose information was breached; 2. In many cases, notify the media; and 3. Notify the FTC.
These days, it is almost impossible to be in business and not have personally identifying information about your customers or employees. If this information falls into the wrong hands, it could put them at risk for identity theft. Find out the steps to take and who to contact if sensitive data is compromised.
Attention app developers! Basic truth-in-advertising and privacy principles apply to your product. It’s important to give the straight story about what your app can do and be transparent about your privacy practices. This start-from-scratch publication from the FTC reminds you to consider your choices from the user's perspective.
Mobile app developers: How does your app size up? Have your built security in from the start? The FTC has a dozen tips to help you develop kick-app security for your product.
Most businesses collect and store sensitive information about their employees and customers. If you use Peer-to-Peer (P2P) file sharing software in your business, consider the security implications and minimize the risks associated with it.
Practical tips for business on creating and implementing a plan for safeguarding personal information.
Do the settings on your servers open your system to misuse? An international group of government agencies says a few quick, easy, and no- or low-cost steps can protect your computer systems.
It’s just common sense that any company or organization that collects personal information from customers or employees needs a security plan. Learn more about designing and implementing a plan tailor-made to your business.
What’s on the credit and debit card receipts you give your customers? Under federal law, you must delete the card’s expiration date and shorten the account information to include no more than the last five digits of the card number.