Business Blog

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Background checks on prospective employees: Keep required disclosures simple

If your company gets background information on prospective employees, it’s likely you’re covered by the Fair Credit Reporting Act. Before you get a background screening report, the law requires that you make certain disclosures and get a prospective employee’s authorization. Is it time for a FCRA compliance check?

Publishers Business Services: Quotable quotes on remand

As any golfer will tell you, consistent follow-through is essential. And when the FTC files a lawsuit to protect consumers, the agency is in it for 18 holes – and a play-off, if necessary. Filed as part of Operation TELE-PHONEY, a nationwide crackdown on deceptive telemarketing, the FTC sued Publishers Business Services in 2008.

Pushing the envelope?

There are oldies but goodies. Then there are oldies and baddies. The FTC warns people looking for business opportunities to watch out for trendy tech scams and retro rip-offs. A New Jersey-based outfit cranked the Wayback Machine into overdrive by putting a contemporary spin on what may be one of the granddaddies of all bogus bizopps.

Your cop on the privacy beat

You often hear the FTC described as America’s top cop on the privacy beat. We’re not the only agency working on privacy and data security issues, of course, but we have the broadest jurisdiction. And for more than 20 years, we have used it thoughtfully and forcefully to protect consumers even as new products and services emerge and evolve.

Protecting Privacy in Transatlantic Data Flows: The EU–U.S. Privacy Shield

Commercial cross-border data flows continue to grow in our internet-enabled economy. These data flows, often involving personal data, support innovative new business services and consumer products. At the same time, they raise questions of how to protect privacy across borders. Various mechanisms help both businesses and consumers with this challenge. One in which the FTC plays a key role is the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield.

BOTS Act: That’s the ticket!

It used to be a rite of passage: spending the night in a line outside the box office to score tickets to the Stones, Springsteen, or [insert your favorite group here]. The convenience of internet ticket sales ended the sleeping-on-the-sidewalk ritual. But online ticket sales raised another concern: Were prospective buyers losing out to computer programs that scooped up the best seats only to resell them at inflated prices?

Connected, collected, protected? FTC-NHTSA event explores drive toward connected cars

In the 80s, the appropriately-named group The Cars asked the musical question, “Who’s gonna drive you home?” The FTC and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are hosting a workshop on June 28, 2017, to examine the consumer privacy and security implications of automated and connected motor vehicles. The questions won’t be of the musical variety, but we have a list of them and welcome your input.

Annual highlights shed light on FTC year in review

On the first day of law school, students learn the Latin maxim Res ipsa loquitor – “The thing speaks for itself.” Pardon the inaccurate translation, but in the case of the FTC’s Annual Highlights, we think Tabula crustum ipsa loquitor – “The pie chart speaks for itself.” In other words, the statistical recap of the past year tells an important story about what the FTC is doing to protect consumers and promote competition.

FTC alleges deceptive “free” offers teed off golfers and left home chefs feeling burned

When websites prominently advertised “FREE!” golf balls and other gear, duffers and low-handicappers alike swung for the deal. But according to the FTC, 10 related defendants drove consumers into the rough with poorly disclosed terms and conditions, deceptive negative options, and misleading upsells, in violation of the FTC Act and the Restore Online Shoppers’ Confidence Act.

Upromise?

If you make promises to consumers, you must honor them – and if you sign an FTC order, you must comply with it. That’s the lesson learned by Upromise, a college savings website, which must pay $500,000 for violating its existing FTC order.

Not familiar with Upromise? It offers free memberships that allow consumers to earn cash-back rewards on certain purchases. Members can direct those rewards to a college savings plan or to pay down student loans.

FTC alleges company’s practices are “patently” deceptive

Threats of imprisonment, warnings about extortion, and a security team allegedly comprised of ex-Israeli Special Ops trained in Krav Maga? It sounds like an action-packed movie plot, but it’s all related to a complaint filed by the FTC. And you’ll never guess the nature of the defendants’ business.

They sell patent and invention promotion services – or at least that’s what defendants World Patent Marketing, Desa Industries, and CEO Scott Cooper claim.

New video on the NIST Cybersecurity Framework and the FTC

Businesses often ask: “If I comply with the NIST Cybersecurity Framework, am I complying with what the FTC requires?” Maybe you read our blog explaining how the NIST Cybersecurity Framework relates to the FTC’s work on data security? Now, check out this related video featuring Andrea Arias, an attorney in the FTC’s Division of Privacy and Identity Protection.

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