Business Blog


FTC to glue company: Stick to established Made in USA principles

The phrase is only nine letters long, but for many consumers, it makes the difference between a product in the shopping basket and one left on the shelf. It’s “Made in USA” and the FTC just announced a settlement of its lawsuit against Chemence, Inc., for misleading Made in USA claims. If your company makes similar representations, is it time for a compliance check?

Trucking firms tricked – and it wasn’t a Halloween prank

With only two weeks until Halloween, people are starting to think about their costumes. A pirate, a witch, a Jedi knight – or an enforcement official from the U.S. Department of Transportation? According to an FTC lawsuit, that’s the disguise a Florida-based operation used to take in more than $19 million from small businesses.

New Identity Theft Report helps you spot ID theft

Do you ever hear from customers or employees who want you to know that they’ve been affected by identity theft? If so, you’ll probably start seeing them use the new FTC Identity Theft Report. It tells you that someone important to your business is a crime victim, has alerted law enforcement, and is working to resolve the financial and emotional disruption that identity theft causes.

Drone privacy discussion goes aloft

They’re overhead, on consumers’ minds, and under consideration this afternoon at the latest installment of the FTC’s Fall Technology Series. The topic is drones and experts on drone technology are gathering at the FTC right now to talk over the implications for consumer privacy. The event, which is free and open to the public, takes flight at 1:00 ET at the FTC’s Constitution Center conference facility, 400 7th Street, S.W., in Washington.

Abating bait-and-switch buyback tactic for devices

It’s a digital spin on an old-school business: an online service that offers to pay “top dollar” for consumers’ used smartphones, laptops, or tablets. The technology may be trending, but according to the FTC and the State of Georgia, Nevada-based Laptop & Desktop Repair engaged in a classic 20th century bait-and-switch – and bilked consumers out of millions in the process.

When flexibility isn’t a virtue: Tips from the Supple case

As consumers age, they want to remain supple, as in limber, lithe, and flexible. Ads for the beverage Supple claimed the product would provide complete and long-lasting relief from joint pain and treat chronic pain caused by arthritis and fibromyalgia. But according to the FTC, the marketers of Supple were a little too flexible – with the facts, that is. The FTC’s lawsuit also challenges the independence of the doctor who endorsed the product.

Record $1.3 billion ruling against Scott Tucker and others behind AMG payday lending

The FTC’s lawsuit against AMG Services, Scott Tucker, and others challenged deceptive and unfair payday lending and debt collection practices that targeted cash-strapped consumers. The case has already resulted in an important ruling related to the scope of the FTC Act. But an order granting the FTC’s Motion for Summary Judgment includes a history-making provision: a $1.3 billion financial remedy – the largest ever in a litigated FTC case.

Deal or no deal? FTC challenges yo-yo financing tactics

Not many kids play with yo-yos these days, but an FTC complaint against nine related Los Angeles-area car dealers charges that the companies engaged in (among other things) illegal yo-yo financing practices – and for affected consumers, it was no game. Even if you don’t have clients in the auto industry, this case merits your attention.

Drone technology: Does it deliver privacy?

Delivery by drone? We thought the Jetsons’ personal jetpack was the height of futuristic fantasy, but drone technology is bringing benefits like that closer to reality. But what about the consumer protection implications, especially when it comes to privacy? That’s on the agenda at the second installment of the FTC’s Fall Technology Series on drones on October 13, 2016.

Protecting your business from ransomware

Ransom notes used to come in the form of pasted letters clipped from newspapers. Now datanappers gain entry through a weak spot in a company’s network, lock the business out of its own system, and hold files – including sensitive health or financial information – for ransom. Would you know how to react if your business is the next victim? And are you taking reasonable steps to reduce the risk of that happening?

The NIST Cybersecurity Framework and the FTC

We often get the question, “If I comply with the NIST Cybersecurity Framework, am I complying with what the FTC requires?”  From the perspective of the staff of the Federal Trade Commission, NIST’s Cybersecurity Framework is consistent with the process-based approach that the FTC has followed since the late 1990s, the 60+ law enforcement actions the FTC has brought to date, and the agency’s educational messages to companies, including its recent Start with Security guidance.  First, a littl

Leaving info behind, in (rental) cars

Gary Numan sang, “Here in my car, I can only receive.” Well, those days are in the past. More and more vehicles are outfitted with the latest communications technologies like Bluetooth, GPS navigation, roadside assistance, streaming music, and web browsing. With mobile technologies in rental cars, consumers’ personal information can stay with the car long after the consumer has returned it. If you’re a car rental company, it’s important to think about protecting consumer privacy in connected rental cars.