Tag: Children's Privacy

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Who should be in the driver’s seat when it comes to the collection of personal information online from kids under 13?  That’s easy:  Parents.  To keep up with technology, the FTC revised the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule last year.  As a result, some companies that may not...
Today’s Business Blog post is brought to you by the letters C-O-P-P-A. If your website or online service is covered by the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, you’re readying your business for the changes that go into effect on July 1, 2013. For the benefit of those looking for...
As part of an ongoing effort to help businesses comply with the requirements of the updated Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule, the Federal Trade Commission sent educational letters to more than 90 businesses that may be affected by the changes.
Have you marked your calendar for July 1, 2013?  As the FTC announced in December 2012, that’s the date revisions to the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule take effect.  If COPPA compliance is on your “to do” list, you’ll want to stay in the know about two related developments...
The Federal Trade Commission voted unanimously to retain the July 1, 2013 date for implementation of the updated Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule.  In a letter to industry organizations that had requested that the Commission reconsider the July 1 date, the Commission noted that...
A lot has been happening on the COPPA front.  A few years ago, the FTC announced it was taking a fresh look at the Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule to make sure it was keeping up with the times.  Hundreds attended a national workshop to offer their candid assessment of what...
The Federal Trade Commission has issued an updated set of frequently asked questions designed to help website operators, mobile application developers, plug-ins and advertising networks operating on child-directed websites and online services prepare for upcoming changes to the Children’s Online...
The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, will hold a forum to discuss child identity theft. Government, business, non-profit, legal service providers, and victim advocates will explore the...
The Federal Trade Commission will host a Town Hall meeting on May 6-7, 2008, to explore the evolving mobile commerce (M-commerce) marketplace and its implications for consumer protection policy. This Town Hall, titled “Beyond Voice: Mapping the Mobile Marketplace,” follows up on the...
The FTC hosted a public roundtable to explore whether to update the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule. The Rule was enacted in 2000 and requires Web site operators to obtain parental consent before collecting, using, or disclosing personal information from children under 13...
The Federal Trade Commission will host a series of day-long public roundtable discussions to explore the privacy challenges posed by the vast array of 21st century technology and business practices that collect and use consumer data. Such practices include social networking, cloud...
Consumers have made it clear: They want to know what their apps are up to.  And when it comes to apps for kids, italicize that, put it in ALL CAPS, and multiply by 10.  That’s why the FTC has released a new way of letting parents know just what their kids’ apps may be doing.  Savvy...
The Federal Trade Commission has released a new video designed to give mobile app developers information they can use to ensure that their innovative efforts also protect the interests of consumers.
In the few years it’s been up and running, Path has billed itself as a different kind of social network.  According to a description of its "Values," "Path should be private by default.  Forever.  You should always be in control of your information and experience."  It’s a lovely...
It’s not often we describe something as a drop-what-you’re-doing development.  But if you’ve been following proposed changes to the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) Rule, this may qualify.  After national workshops, Federal Register Notices, and hundreds of comments...
The Federal Trade Commission adopted final amendments to the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule that strengthen kids’ privacy protections and give parents greater control over the personal information that websites and online services may collect from children under 13. 

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