Tag: Privacy and Security

Displaying 1 - 20 of 1016 results.

After a public comment period, the Federal Trade Commission has approved a final order resolving the Commission’s complaint against Nomi Technologies for misleading consumers about the available choices to opt-out of the company’s mobile device tracking program.
What information are kids’ app developers collecting, who are they sharing it with, and what are they telling parents about their practices? The FTC staff first asked those questions in 2012. Fast forward three years, and how have things changed? According to the FTC’s Office of...
The FTC’s Office of Technology Research and Investigation conducted a follow-up survey examining what information kids’ app developers are collecting from users, whom they are sharing it with, and what disclosures they are providing to parents about their practices. The findings will be announced...
The Federal Trade Commission has moved the second Debt Collection Dialogue, the “Dallas Dialogue,” to Southern Methodist University’s Dedman School of Law on September 29, 2015. The FTC switched to this larger venue because the number of pre-registrations had almost reached the maximum for the...
The Federal Trade Commission has extended the deadline for public comment on the proposed verifiable parental consent method that Riyo, Inc., has submitted for Commission approval under the agency’s Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule.The deadline for comments has been extended to Sept. 14,...
It’s called PrivacyCon and the first-of-its-kind FTC event is scheduled for January 14, 2016.
The Federal Trade Commission will host a conference in January examining cutting-edge research and trends in protecting consumer privacy and security. The event, called PrivacyCon, is the first of its kind and will bring together leading stakeholders, including whitehat researchers, academics,...
FTC watchers and data security mavens, it’s the decision you’ve been waiting for. The United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit has issued a ruling in the Commission’s favor in FTC v. Wyndham Worldwide Corporation.
“Today’s Third Circuit Court of Appeals decision reaffirms the FTC’s authority to hold companies accountable for failing to safeguard consumer data. It is not only appropriate, but critical, that the FTC has the ability to take action on behalf of consumers when companies fail to take reasonable...
You’ve read Start with Security: A Guide for Business, the new brochure about the FTC’s 53 data security settlements. You’ve digested the lessons learned from those cases. The next step: applying them at your company. The FTC has an easy way to get the ball rolling.
Federal Trade Commission Chairwoman Edith Ramirez will provide the opening remarks at the FTC’s first Start with Security conference, being held Sept. 9 at the University of California Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco.
The Federal Trade Commission will hold a conference on January 14, 2016 to bring together a diverse group of stakeholders, including whitehat researchers, academics, industry representatives, consumer advocates, academics, and a range of government regulators, to discuss the latest...
An app developer, a medical waste company, a skateboard event sponsor, a stock car racing school, and a bagel purveyor. That’s either the strangest answer to a Jeopardy! question – or a partial list of companies that just settled FTC charges that they falsely claimed they were...
Thirteen companies have agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that they misled consumers by claiming they were certified members of the U.S.-EU or U.S.-Swiss Safe Harbor Frameworks when their certifications had lapsed or the companies had never applied for membership in the program at...
The Beatles were right: One does get by with a little help from one’s friends – but that’s not always a good thing. A partial settlement just announced by the FTC sheds light on the unsavory cooperative relationship between certain shadowy data brokers and the scammers who buy their...
Businesses are understandably concerned about the threat that hackers pose to the security of sensitive data on their networks. But a closing letter the FTC staff sent to Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC warns of another danger lurking closer to home.

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