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CoStar Group, Inc., Lonestar Acquisition Sub, Inc., and LoopNet, Inc., In the Matter of

The FTC required CoStar Group, the largest provider of commercial real estate information services in the United States, to sell LoopNet's ownership interest in Xceligent, under an order settling charges that CoStar's $860 million acquisition of LoopNet would be anticompetitive. The FTC's complaint alleges the proposed acquisition would reduce competition in the markets for real estate listings databases and information services. The modified final order resolving the charges preserves competition that otherwise would have been lost through the acquisition by requiring the combined firm to sell LoopNet's interest in Xceligent, a significant provider of U.S. commercial real estate information.

Type of Action
Administrative
Last Updated
FTC Matter/File Number
111 0172

FTC Testifies on Do Not Track Legislation

Date
The Federal Trade Commission told Congress today that while the Commission recognizes that consumers may benefit in certain ways from the practice of tracking consumers online to serve targeted...

Fidelity National Financial, Inc, In the Matter of (LandAmerica Financial)

To settle charges that its 2008 acquisition of three LandAmerica Financial, Inc. subsidiaries was anticompetitive, Fidelity National Financial, Inc. agree to sell several title plants and related assets in six geographic areas: 1) the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area, consisting of Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties; 2) Benton County, Oregon; 3) Jackson County, Oregon; 4) Marion County, Oregon; 5) Linn County, Oregon; and 6) the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan area consisting of Oakland, Macomb, and Wayne counties.

Type of Action
Administrative
Last Updated
FTC Matter/File Number
091 0032

Dun & Bradstreet Corporation, The, In the Matter of

The FTC issued an administrative complaint on 5/7/2010 challenging The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation February 2009 acquisition of Quality Education Data (QED) and alleging that the deal hurt consumers by eliminating nearly all competition in the market for kindergarten through twelfth-grade educational marketing databases. The data sold by these companies is used to sell books, education materials, and other products to teachers and other educators nationwide. The combination of the two companies gave Dun & Bradstreet, through its subsidiary Market Data Retrieval (MDR), more than 90 percent of the market for K-12 educational marketing data. Dun & Bradstreet acquired QED from Scholastic, Inc. for about $29 million, which was below the threshold amount that would have required the companies to notify U.S. antitrust authorities before finalizing the deal.

Type of Action
Administrative
Last Updated
FTC Matter/File Number
091 0081
Docket Number
9342

Aspen Technology, Inc., In the Matter of

Under terms of the order, Aspen agreed to divest Hypotech’s continuous process and batch process assets and Aspen’s operator training software and service business to a Commission-approved buyer to settle charges in the complaint and resolve the administrative proceedings. The Commission issued an administrative complaint on August 6, 2003 that challenged Aspen’s 2002 acquisition of Hyprotech, Ltd. alleging that the acquisition eliminated a significant competitor in the provision of process engineering simulation software for industry. According to the complaint, the acquisition has led to reduced innovation competition in six specific process engineering simulation software markets.

Type of Action
Administrative
Last Updated
FTC Matter/File Number
021 0153
Docket Number
9310

Reed Elsevier NV, et al., In the Matter of

In September, 2008, the Commission challenged Reed Elsevier’s $4.1 billion proposed acquisition of ChoicePoint, which would have combined the two leading providers of electronic public record services provided to U.S. law enforcement customers. Public records services compile public and non-public records about individuals and businesses, including credit data, criminal, motor vehicle, property, and employment records, all used by law enforcement as an investigative tool in solving a wide variety of crimes. The transaction, as proposed, would have removed the intense rivalry that had lead to lower prices, product innovations, and improved services and support for law enforcement customers by eliminating the competition between Reed Elsevier’s LexisNexis product and ChoicePoint’s AutoTrackXP and CLEAR products. The Commission required divestiture of ChoicePoint’s product lines to Thomson Reuters Legal Inc. The Commission worked with the Attorneys General of eighteen states on this investigation.

Type of Action
Administrative
Last Updated
FTC Matter/File Number
081 0133

CCC Holdings Inc., and Aurora Equity Partners III L.P., In the Matter of

In November 2008, the Commission issued an administrative complaint charging that the acquisition of CCC Information Services by Mitchell International, a transaction valued at $1.4 billion, would be anticompetitive in the market for “estimatics”, a database system used by auto insurers and repair shops to generate repair estimates for consumers. According to the complaint, the transaction would also harm competition in the market for total loss valuation (TLV) systems, used to inform consumers when their vehicle has been totaled. The transaction would create a new entity with well over half of the market share for these systems, allowing for unilateral price increases, and facilitating coordination among the remaining smaller competitors in the market. The Commission concurrently authorized staff to file a complaint in Federal District Court. On March 9, 2009, the US District Court for the District of Columbia ordered a preliminary injunction and temporary restraining order preventing the parties from consummating the transaction pending a full administrative trial on the merits. On March 13, 2009, since the respondents announced that they decided not to proceed with the proposed merger the Commssion dismissed the Administrative Complaint.

Type of Action
Administrative
Last Updated
FTC Matter/File Number
081 0155
Docket Number
9334

CCC Holdings/Mitchell International

In November 2008, the Commission authorized staff to file a complaint in Federal District Court, charging that the acquisition of CCC Information Services by Mitchell International, a transaction valued at $1.4 billion, would be anticompetitive in the market for “estimatics”, a database system used by auto insurers and repair shops to generate repair estimates for consumers. According to the complaint, the transaction would also harm competition in the market for total loss valuation (TLV) systems, used to inform consumers when their vehicle has been totaled. The transaction would create a new entity with well over half of the market share for these systems, allowing for unilateral price increases, and facilitating coordination among the remaining smaller competitors in the market. The Commission concurrently issued an administrative complaint. On March 9, 2009, the US District Court for the District of Columbia ordered a preliminary injunction and temporary restraining order preventing the parties from consummating the transaction pending a full administrative trial on the merits. On March 13, 2009, since the respondents announced that they decided not to proceed with the proposed merger the Commssion dismissed the Administrative Complaint.

Type of Action
Federal
Last Updated
FTC Matter/File Number
081 0155

Court Orders Halt to Sale of Spyware

Date
At the request of the Federal Trade Commission, a U.S. District Court has issued a temporary restraining order halting the sale of keylogger spyware. According to the FTC’s complaint, the Florida...

Negotiated Data Solutions LLC., In the Matter of

The Commission charged that Negotiated Data Solutions LLC (N-Data) violated Section 5 of the FTC Act by engaging in unfair methods of competition. N-Data acquired patent rights originally held by National Semiconductor Corp. which were included in an IEEE industry standard for autonegotiation technology, which allows Ethernet devices made by different manufacturers to work together. Ethernet is a computer networking standard that is used in nearly every computer sold in the U.S. N-Data reneged on National Semiconductor’s commitment to charge a one-time royalty of $1000 to manufacturers or sellers of products using the IEEE standard, and demanded higher royalties from users. In a consent agreement resolving the charges, N-Data must stop enforcing the patents at issue unless N-Data has first offered a license under the original terms.

Type of Action
Administrative
Last Updated
FTC Matter/File Number
051 0094

FTC Testifies on Spyware

Date
The Federal Trade Commission today told the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation that “legislation authorizing the Commission to seek civil penalties in spyware cases could add a...

Judgment Entered Against Spyware Scammer

Date
A federal judge has granted the Federal Trade Commission’s request for a default judgment against a software developer who helped scammers infect millions of computers with destructive and intrusive...
Nov01

Ehavioral Advertising: Tracking, Targeting, and Technology

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The FTC hosted a Town Hall that brought together consumer advocates, industry representatives, technology experts, and academics to address consumer protection issues raised by the practice of...