PrivacyCon: Lunch Poster Session

PrivacyCon

Privacy on Adult Websites

Ibrahim Altaweel, Good Research; University of California, Santa Cruz

Poster: Privacy on Adult Websites (PDF)

Ibrahim Altaweel is a student at the University of California, Santa Cruz, a Web Security Engineer at Good Research LLC, and a Privacy Engineer at Purrivacy.org. Mr. Altaweel’s work has been supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF). More information about Ibrahim Altaweel is available at his website https://manip.io. The work presented was funded in part by NSF-TRUST, with significant technology donations from Palantir Technologies and Mezzobit.

Co-authors: Maximillian Hils (University of Münster; University of California, Berkeley), Chris Jay Hoofnagle (University of California, Berkeley)

FPF Mobile Apps Study (2016)

Kelsey Finch, Future of Privacy Forum

Poster: FPF Mobile Apps Study (PDF)

Kelsey Finch is Policy Counsel at the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF). Her areas of focus at FPF include consumer wellness and wearables apps and devices, smart cities, de-identification, ethics and research, and mobile location analytics. Before coming to FPF, Ms. Finch was an inaugural Westin Fellow at the IAPP, where she produced practical research on a range of privacy topics and edited the FTC Privacy Casebook. She is a graduate of Smith College and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, with a concentration in Intellectual Property & Information Law.

No Time At All: Opportunity Cost of Android Permissions

Janne Lindqvist, Rutgers University

Poster: No Time At All: Opportunity Cost of Android Permissions (PDF)

Janne Lindqvist is an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Rutgers University. Dr. Lindqvist works at the intersection of security engineering, human-computer interaction and mobile computing. His work has been featured in hundreds of online, print and broadcast media including Scientific American, MIT Technology Review, IEEE Spectrum, NPR, ABC News Radio, CBS Radio News, Computerworld, Der Spiegel, London Times, International Business Times, and Fortune. The work presented is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers 1228777, 1223977, and 1546689.

Co-Authors: Gradeigh D. Clark (Rutgers University), Swapnil Sarode (Rutgers University)

Privacy Permanence Paradox: Protecting Preteens

Kristen Walker, Nazarian College of Business and Economics; California State University Northridge

Summer Malone Youth-Driven Information Privacy Education Campaign; California State University Northridge

Poster: Privacy Permanence Paradox: Protecting Preteens (PDF)

Kristen Walker is an Associate Professor in the Department of Marketing at California State University Northridge (CSUN). Her research interests merge public policy, technology and marketing to include interactive marketing, social media, retail environments, brand preference, Big Data, and Internet privacy. Named CSUN’s 2015-16 Jerome Richfield Scholar, her research focuses on how consumers surrender information online and promotes youth privacy after work on privacy information educational campaigns for a grant from the Digital Trust Foundation (2015-16). Dr. Walker designed the Interactive Marketing Minor at CSUN, encouraging a variety of majors to understand the changing role of consumer information, its permanence and power in the marketplace. Dr. Walker publishes in marketing and business journals and is on the Editorial Review Board of the Journal of Public Policy and Marketing and the Journal of Consumer Marketing. The work presented was funded by the Digital Trust Foundation and CSUN.

Summer Malone is the Research Project Manager on the YDIPEC grant. As Research Project Director, Ms. Malone manages grant funds and oversees team member tasks. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in Marketing at California State University Northridge (CSUN) in 2016. Summer has extensive experience in social media marketing and managed CSUN’s marketing department (csunmkt) social media platforms during the summer of 2016. For the YDIPEC project, Ms. Malone developed moderator guides and conducted focus groups and interviews with middle-school aged youth. She also develops surveys and monitors budgeting aspects of the grant. Ms. Malone collaborated with Charissa Clark to develop the ‘How To Be A Smart Cookie’ campaign. The work presented was funded by the Digital Trust Foundation and California State University Northridge.

Co-author: Tina Kiesler, Ph.D. (California State University Northridge)

Analyzing Privacy Policies Using the Privacy by Design Framework

Fer O’Neil, Texas Tech University; ESET, San Diego

Poster: Analyzing Privacy Policies Using the Privacy by Design Framework (PDF)

Fer O’Neil is a Ph.D. student in technical communication and rhetoric at Texas Tech University and a knowledgebase technical writer at ESET, a security software company in San Diego, California. Mr. O’Neil received his master’s in technical communication from Minnesota State University, Mankato. His research focuses on usability and user experience, user-centered design, and technical communication as it relates to the digital dissemination of security- and privacy-related issues. The work presented was funded by ESET.

Inference of User Demographics and Habits from Seemingly Benign Smartphone Sensors

Irwin Reyes, International Computer Science Institute       

Poster: Inference of User Demographics and Habits from Seemingly Benign Smartphone Sensors (PDF)

Irwin Reyes is a researcher in the Usable Security and Privacy group at the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI) in Berkeley, CA. Mr. Reyes earned a Master’s degree in Systems Engineering at the University of Virginia in 2011. Prior to his current appointment at ICSI, Mr. Reyes held positions at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and Dell, Inc. His research interests include mobile security, online privacy, and software engineering. The work presented was funded by the Intel Science and Technology Center for Secure Computing (ISTC-SC) and NSF grants CNS-1514211 and CNS-1514457.

Co-authors: Manar Safi (University of California, Berkeley), Serge Egelman (University of California, Berkeley; ICSI)

“Is Our Children’s Apps Learning?” Automatically Detecting COPPA Violations

Irwin Reyes, International Computer Science Institute

Poster: Automatically Detecting COPPA Violations (PDF)

Irwin Reyes is a researcher in the Usable Security and Privacy group at the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI) in Berkeley, CA. Mr. Reyes earned a Master’s degree in Systems Engineering at the University of Virginia in 2011. Prior to his current appointment at ICSI, Mr. Reyes held positions at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and Dell, Inc. His research interests include mobile security, online privacy, and software engineering. The work presented was funded by DHS contract FA8750-16-C-0140 and NSF grant CNS-1318680.

Co-authors: Primal Wijesekera (University of British Columbia, Canada; University of California, Berkeley), Abbas Razaghpanah (Stony Brook University), Joel Reardon (University of California, Berkeley; ICSI), Narseo Vallina-Rodriguez (ICSI; IMDEA Networks), Serge Egelman (University of California, Berkeley; ICSI), Christian Kreibich (ICSI; Lastline)

Usable and Secure Data Analysis

Mayank Varia, Boston University

Poster: Usable and Secure Data Analysis (PDF)

Mayank Varia is the Director of Research for the Modular Approach to Cloud Security (MACS) project and Co-Director of the BU Center for Reliable Information Systems & Cyber Security (RISCS). His research interests span theoretical and applied cryptography and their application to problems throughout computer science. Previously, he worked for four years at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, where he designed and evaluated high performance privacy-enhancing data search technology, created information theoretic metrics to quantify privacy, and developed algorithms to capture linguistic provenance automatically. He received a PhD in Mathematics from MIT for his work on program obfuscation. The presented material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants 1414119 and 1430145.

Consumer Privacy Expectations of Drones

Yang Wang, SALT Lab, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University

Poster: Consumer Privacy Expectations of Drones (PDF)

Yang Wang is an assistant professor in the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University where he co-directs the Social Computing Systems (SALT) Lab. He received his Ph.D. in information and computer science from the University of California, Irvine. His research is centered on usable privacy and security, and social computing. He has been examining privacy issues and building novel privacy-enhancing technologies in different domains such as personalized systems, social media, online behavioral advertising, and drones. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, Department of Health & Human Services, Google, Alcatel-Lucent, and The Privacy Projects. The work presented was funded in part by DJI.

Co-authors: Yaxing Yao (SALT Lab, Syracuse University), Yun Huang (SALT Lab, Syracuse University)

Automated Analysis of Privacy Requirements for Mobile Apps

Sebastian Zimmeck, Carnegie Mellon University

Poster: Automated Analysis of Privacy Requirements for Mobile Apps (PDF)

Sebastian Zimmeck is a postdoc in computer science at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests are web privacy and security, particularly from a machine learning perspective. Before coming to Carnegie Mellon, Mr. Zimmeck studied computer science at Columbia University. He also studied information privacy and intellectual property law and practiced in these areas as an attorney with Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer. The research presented was funded by the National Science Foundation, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the Air Force Research Laboratory.

Co-authors: co-authors: Ziqi Wang (Carnegie Mellon University), Lieyong Zou (Carnegie Mellon University), Roger Iyengar (Washington University in St. Louis), Bin Liu (Carnegie Mellon University), Florian Schaub (University of Michigan), Shomir Wilson (University of Cincinnati), Norman Sadeh (Carnegie Mellon University), Steven M. Bellovin (Columbia University), Joel Reidenberg (School of Law, Fordham University)

The Creation and Analysis of a Website Privacy Policy Corpus

Sebastian Zimmeck, Carnegie Mellon University

Poster: The Creation and Analysis of a Website Privacy Policy Corpus (PDF)

Sebastian Zimmeck is a postdoc in computer science at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests are web privacy and security, particularly from a machine learning perspective. Before coming to Carnegie Mellon, Mr. Zimmeck studied computer science at Columbia University. He also studied information privacy and intellectual property law and practiced in these areas as an attorney with Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer. The research presented was funded by the National Science Foundation, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the Air Force Research Laboratory.

Co-authors: Shomir Wilson (University of Cincinnati), Florian Schaub (Carnegie Mellon University), Aswarth Abhilash Dara (Carnegie Mellon University), Frederick Liu (Carnegie Mellon University), Sushain Cherivirala (Carnegie Mellon University), Pedro Giovanni Leon (Stanford University), Mads Schaarup Andersen (Carnegie Mellon University), Kanthashree Mysore Sathyendra (Carnegie Mellon University), N. Cameron Russell (Fordham University School of Law), Thomas B. Norton (Fordham University School of Law), Eduard Hovy (Carnegie Mellon University), Joel Reidenberg (Fordham University School of Law), and Norman Sadeh (Carnegie Mellon University)