Tag: Health Claims

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Elderberry, hydrogen peroxide, iodine, mushrooms, and horse milk. (Horse milk?) The FTC just sent 50 more warning letters to companies promoting products or services advertised to prevent or treat coronavirus. Here’s the latest list of who’s been warned, what they’re selling, and some...
Since the beginning of the COVID-19 crisis, the FTC has released dozens of warning letters against people trying to make an illegal buck off the Coronavirus. More than a month in, it seems like a good time to look back at what’s happened. If you follow this blog, you’ll know these...
FTC staff just sent letters to 45 more companies making COVID-19 prevention, treatment, or cure claims. There’s a lot to cover in this post, but it’s indicative of the breadth of questionable representations conveyed to consumers in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
It’s a case that brings together eight capital letters that are making headlines: COVID and CBD. A California marketer of a product advertised to prevent or treat COVID-19 has agreed to a preliminary order that prohibits him from making those claims. Pending the resolution of a...
The FTC is not the pen pal you want if you operate a multi-level marketing company but aren’t closely monitoring your distributors.
FTC staff just sent 21 more warning letters to companies that have used allegedly unsubstantiated coronavirus prevention and treatment claims to promote products and services. Many of the latest letters focus on questionable representations for high doses of vitamins, intravenous...
For decades the FTC has been warning people about online ports, portals, and pop-ups that can be conduits for questionable claims. But companies shouldn’t think we’ve taken our eye off another potential doorway for deception: direct mail. According to an FTC lawsuit, a group of seven...
“Oh, my achin’ . . . .” It’s a common refrain for many older Americans and others who experience chronic pain. Some businesses respond with ads heavy on puffed-up promises, but light on the scientific evidence necessary to support serious health claims. That’s the FTC’s allegation...
It’s FTC Advertising 101: Don’t make claims about serious medical conditions unless you have solid proof in hand to substantiate what you say. It’s been the law for decades and now more than ever, it’s essential for advertisers to honor that fundamental principle. And yet companies...

Filtering by content type: Press Release

The Federal Trade Commission is mailing 143,636 refund checks totaling more than $8.5 million to consumers who bought three dietary supplements deceptively marketed by National Urological Group, Inc. (NUG) and several related companies.
The operators of an online subscription scheme agreed to settle a Federal Trade Commission complaint alleging that the defendants duped consumers out of more than $74.5 million by luring them with supposedly “free trial” offers for cosmetics and dietary supplements, then enrolling them in...
The Federal Trade Commission announced it has sent 45 more letters warning marketers nationwide to stop making unsubstantiated claims that their products and therapies can treat or prevent COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus. This is the fourth set of warning letters the FTC has announced...
The Federal Trade Commission today announced it has sent 10 letters warning multi-level marketing companies (MLMs) to remove and address claims that they or their participants are making about their products’ ability to treat or prevent coronavirus disease or about the earnings people who have...
The Federal Trade Commission announced it has sent 21 additional letters warning marketers throughout the United States to stop making unsubstantiated claims that their products and therapies can treat or prevent coronavirus (COVID-19). This is the third set of warning letters the FTC has sent to...
The marketers of three supplements called Neurocet, Regenify, and Resetigen-D have settled a Federal Trade Commission complaint alleging they deceptively promoted their products to older Americans using false claims that their products could stop pain and treat age-related ailments.
A Florida-based company that has promoted its Isoprex supplement to older adults as a miracle cure for pain and joint inflammation has agreed to a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission that bars the company from continuing to make its unproven claims.
Continuing its efforts to protect consumers from scams and deceptive pitches related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the Federal Trade Commission today announced it has sent 10 additional letters warning companies, both in the United States and abroad, to cease making unsubstantiated claims...

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In response to an FTC complaint, in April 2020, a California-based marketer of a supplement consisting mainly of Vitamin C and herbal extracts has agreed to a preliminary order barring him from claiming that it is effective at treating, preventing, or reducing the risk of COVID-19....
In response to an FTC complaint, in April 2020, a California-based marketer of a supplement consisting mainly of Vitamin C and herbal extracts has agreed to a preliminary order barring him from claiming that it is effective at treating, preventing, or reducing the risk of COVID-19....

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