Tag: Health Claims

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Imagine a series of promotions that involve pain relief promises, cognition claims, endorsements, 30-minute radio ads, “risk-free” money-back guarantees, “free” trial offers, negative options, telemarketing, and upsells of buying club memberships. What could possibly go wrong for...
Fans of “Shark Tank” will remember it as one of the show’s most dramatic bidding wars. Charles Yim, CEO of Breathometer, pitched his smartphone-enabled breathalyzer as a way to “help people make smarter and safer decisions” about drinking and driving. All five sharks went for the...
Ads for Prevagen claimed that the purported memory improvement supplement is “The Name to Remember,” but according to a lawsuit filed by the FTC and the New York Attorney General, it’s a product consumers might be better off forgetting.
“Just like the white winged dove sings a song,” you can count on the BCP Business Blog to celebrate the “Edge of Seventeen” – 2017, of course – with a recap of in-case-you-missed-it developments from 2016. (Sorry, Stevie Nicks. That was a stretch.) In no particular order, here is our...
Is it time for a little heart-to-heart about making health claims for mobile apps? An FTC settlement with California-based Aura Labs challenges misleading representations the company made about its Instant Blood Pressure app. In addition, if you keep your finger on the pulse of FTC...
The FTC applies a consistent approach to evaluating ad claims. Companies must have a reasonable basis for objective representations, including claims that a product can treat specific health conditions. Whether it’s an over-the-counter drug, dietary supplement, or food, the same...

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The Federal Trade Commission and the Maine Office of the Attorney General today announced a complaint and three settlements with dietary supplement marketers who allegedly used radio infomercials deceptively formatted as talk shows and print ads featuring fictitious endorsers to advertise...
The Federal Trade Commission is mailing refunds that total $2.59 million to more than 1,300 people who bought Mercola indoor tanning systems. These refunds are the result of a 2016 settlement between the FTC and Dr. Joseph Mercola and his companies.
The marketers of two app-supported smartphone accessories, marketed to accurately measure consumers’ blood alcohol content (BAC), have agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that they lacked scientific evidence to back up their advertising claims.
The Federal Trade Commission and New York State Attorney General have charged the marketers of the dietary supplement Prevagen with making false and unsubstantiated claims that the product improves memory, provides cognitive benefits, and is “clinically shown” to work.
Following a public comment period, the Federal Trade Commission has approved a final consent order with Mars Petcare U.S. settling charges that the company falsely advertised specific health benefits of its Eukanuba brand dog food.
The Federal Trade Commission has granted summary decision against California Naturel, Inc., for falsely advertising its sunscreen product as “all natural” in violation of Sections 5 and 12 of the FTC Act.
The marketers of a mobile app designed to measure blood pressure have agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that they deceived consumers with claims that their Instant Blood Pressure (IBP) app was as accurate as a traditional blood pressure cuff. In addition, the Commission alleged...

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Federal Register Notice: Federal Trade Commission Enforcement Policy Statement on Marketing Claims for Over-the-Counter Homeopathic Drugs

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