A Preliminary FTC Staff Report on "Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change: A Proposed Framework for Businesses and Policymakers" #00277

Submission Number:
00277
Commenter:
John Schumann
State:
Ohio
Initiative Name:
A Preliminary FTC Staff Report on "Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change: A Proposed Framework for Businesses and Policymakers"
Internet tracking is nothing more than stalking, it's peeping toms, it is another form of harassment and surveillance - unwanted and uninvited. Most states have laws against this type of behavior yet these laws have not yet been applied to cyberspace. Articles in the Wall Street Journal in the summer of 2010 clearly show how surreptitious, intrusive, and persistent these business have become. Their "beacons" replicate themselves upon deletion. Yet, most citizens are unaware that age, gender, race, zip code, income, martial status, health concerns, hobbies,interests have become public information. The industry's response to this is ludicrous. "We don't track anyone by name." Correct, no names, but how many [redacted] These business have used a public medium to basically create a permanent surveillance system. The banking industry has done the same thing by sharing their customer's transaction history. If someone is unconcerned about sharing their personal data with the world, that is fine. Each person should have the right to choose. In today's environment, there is no choice. All citizens are raped of their privacy "as permitted by law" - as the banks tell us every year. Congress has shown that where "business interest" [read: money] is at stake, the public interest be damned and no substantive action can be enacted. A Do Not Track option is an excellent idea. It is long overdue.