FTC to Host Public Workshop Examining the U.S. Auto Distribution System Workshop Will Explore Competition, State Regulations, and Emerging Trends in the Industry, Project No. P131202 #74

Submission Number:
74
Commenter:
Mark Hovis
State:
North Carolina
Initiative Name:
FTC to Host Public Workshop Examining the U.S. Auto Distribution System Workshop Will Explore Competition, State Regulations, and Emerging Trends in the Industry, Project No. P131202
The argument auto dealers are giving against allowing this action is to protect the customer. Here is my personal experience. I purchased a Chevy Volt in 2012. I called Victory Chevrolet in Mt. Holly North Carolina to ask to purchase a Volt. They refused to sell me one at full MSRP. Furthermore they would not even tell me how much I could buy one for even though they had one in the showroom. I was forced to move to a larger dealership Hendrick Motors in Charlotte NC to where I had to pay full MSRP. Somewhere after the 2nd year of ownership the supplied 110V EVSE failed. I took it to McKinney Chevrolet in Gastonia NC where even while walking through the service door, the older gentlemen sitting behind the desk declared that they did not cover that item. He had not even said hello, taken my name or information. I turned to the managers desk and ask him to look it up to find out it was indeed covered under warranty. Anyone can make a mistake. The problem as I see it is a clear biased against selling and supporting the electric technology. It appears to me that EVs need the same exemption that has been granted the three wheeled vehicles so that that customers will be taken care of properly. My personal experiences show me that the arguments of protection made by dealerships are not holding up. We as Americans need the opportunity of choice, at least with new companies like Elio and Tesla who have not participated in past agreements.