FTC to Host September Workshop in Washington, DC, to Examine Advertising for Over-the-Counter Homeopathic Products #00505

Submission Number:
00505
Commenter:
Katrina Thurlow
State:
Outside the United States
Initiative Name:
FTC to Host September Workshop in Washington, DC, to Examine Advertising for Over-the-Counter Homeopathic Products
As noted in the CPG, "drug products containing homeopathic ingredients in combination with non-homeopathic active ingredients are not homeopathic drug products." Dynamized "combination remedies" for specific allopathically labelled syndromes must also be strongly discouraged. First, these medicines are not homeopathic, and should not be labelled as such. They do not adhere to the cardinal laws of homeopathy, and their actions, though usually gentle, cannot be predicted or controlled. "Side effects" are mild and passing, but suppression is frequent and cure is rare with such formulations. Second, combination remedies open the door for disintegrous companies to grossly overcharge and to make false claims about their "proprietary formulations", to consumers who are not familiar with homeopathic therapeutics. The FTC must not confuse true homeopathy, with this kind of dishonesty. Homeopathic medicines should take the form of sugar pellets, or drops fixed in alcohol. Extraneous ingredients could be prohibited. The cream or gel base of certain products such as Arnica, could be an exception, as homeopathic medicine is readily absorbed through the skin. Homeopathic medicines work best when used individually, under the guidance of a qualified practitioner. Consumers of homeopathy should be encouraged to understand that they are using ultra-molecular medicine, and accept responsibility for this choice. However, it must remain clear that ultra-molecular medicine is not equivalent to placebo.