16 CFR Part 456 ; Agency Information Collection Activities: Review; Comment Request Ophthalmic Practice Rule (Eyeglass Rule): FTC Project No. R511996 #00729

Submission Number:
00729
Commenter:
Alexa Adler
State:
New York
Initiative Name:
16 CFR Part 456 ; Agency Information Collection Activities: Review; Comment Request Ophthalmic Practice Rule (Eyeglass Rule): FTC Project No. R511996
I'd like to comment on Eyeglass Rule, 16 CFR Part 456, Project No. R511996. Please note: I am currently an employee at Warby Parker. These comments reflect my personal views. Last month, a colleague on our customer service team approached me with a concerning story. A customer had received an eye exam and an eyewear prescription from an optometrist in Beverly Hills, CA. Using the prescription, the customer then ordered a pair of Warby Parker glasses. The customer experienced some dizziness when he started wearing the glasses and was concerned that his optometrist provided an inaccurate prescription. He called his optometrist to discuss his dizziness and verify the accuracy of the prescription. Upon learning that the customer had ordered Warby Parker glasses, the optometrist refused to assist or further treat his patient. The optometrist told our customer that because the glasses were purchased from Warby Parker -- and not from the optometrist's optical store -- he would no longer treat or talk to the customer. The customer was shocked by his doctor's behavior. As a courtesy, we fulfilled a new pair of glasses with the same prescription, at no cost to the customer, to understand if there had been a fulfillment error. But the second pair of glasses caused him dizziness again; so the customer returned them for a full refund. It doesn't seem right that a doctor can refuse to verify a patient's prescription based on where he/she chooses to have it filled.