16 CFR Part 456 ; Agency Information Collection Activities: Review; Comment Request Ophthalmic Practice Rule (Eyeglass Rule): FTC Project No. R511996 #00664

Submission Number:
00664
Commenter:
john berry
State:
Georgia
Initiative Name:
16 CFR Part 456 ; Agency Information Collection Activities: Review; Comment Request Ophthalmic Practice Rule (Eyeglass Rule): FTC Project No. R511996
as a person who works in the field it would be great for me to have the pupilary distance provided by the prescribing doctor from the eye exam. right now it is such a hassle for us as providers of eyeglasses because many times we have to tell consumers that our job or company does not allow us to give that information to the consumer if we are taking measurements for their order of eyeglasses. if the doctor provided this information to them then we would not have to be hassled by this problem all the time. on the other side there needs to be protection for the doctors because most doctors have equipment that can measure this pupilary distance for consumers but there needs to be protection for the doctors if they do provide this measurement in case a consumer orders eyeglasses from a physical provider or an online provider of eyeglasses and their order is not made properly and some accident or injury occurs because the eyeglasses were made improperly although the correct pupilary distance was provided. there is no additional costs to the doctors in this matter of providing this measurement and many doctors do this now with the increased use of online ordering. online ordering of eyeglasses do tell consumers how to take their own pupilary measurement but by having the doctor provide it on the prescription would be safer for the consumer. there should be a requirement that the retail provider has to verify that measurement when making or providing eyeglasses. and if the verification is different then that measurement needs to be used instead of the one on the prescription just as a safeguard measure for the consumer. many retailers or professionals i would hope do this anyway just to make sure of the accuarcy of the measurement. as far as the matter of requiring the doctor to provide duplicate copies of a written prescription this is pretty much a courtesy that is done now without there being a requirement for a providing doctor to do this although there should be leeway for a doctor to be able to charge for an excessive amount of requests by consumers who cant keep up with this important document. to get around this the consumer could easily get a copy when they go to a retail establishment and have that retailer get a copy of the prescription by filling out a hippa release form to have the provider fax over a copy of the prescription or record for service. thus requiring the doctor to provide duplicate copies of prescriptions is not necessary as a regulation since it is already being done on a voluntary basis