16 CFR Part 315; Agency Information Collection Activities: Review; Comment Request; Contact Lens Rule: FTC Project No. R511995 #00526

Submission Number:
00526
Commenter:
Joseph Douglas
State:
Michigan
Initiative Name:
16 CFR Part 315; Agency Information Collection Activities: Review; Comment Request; Contact Lens Rule: FTC Project No. R511995
Glasses Rx and contact lens Rx are two very different types of prescription and should not be treated the same or a general sense of low risk to the health of the eye. Each contact lens has specific characteristics to it. Two contact lenses may have the same diameter but different base curves. Too tight of a base curve can cause an inflammatory response which can lead to a corneal ulcer and increase in medical costs. Too loose of a base curve and the lens can move off center and vision may be distorted at any given time,i.e. driving therefore causing an accident. Extension of the contact lens Rx over a year is not recommended in my professional opinion. For example while in college I was able to wear my low oxygen contact lenses over twelve hours. As I aged, my tear film quality began to decrease and my wear time decreased. New lenses with higher oxygen were developed and I am able to wear contact lenses in a similiar fashion. If my Rx was extended beyond what my doctor Rx'd I may have run into inflammatory problems and worse case an ulcer and loss of some acuity. Without the specified check up I would not have known I was doing damage to my eyes with those low oxygen lenes. The eye is a fascinating sense organ that unfortunately has very little pain receptors on the inside. The fact that we have two eyes, disease is one that reduces vision is compensated by the good vision in the other without knowledge to the patient. Extending glasses rx beyond two years gives a patient a sense of false good health. Even though the vision is good, disease if caught early could limit the severity of vision loss down the road. The Rx verification process if done properly will work well. A patient doesn't go to a pharmacist and ask for medication without written script verified by the writer of the script. What if medication was treated the same way contact rx's are treated? "If you don't respond in 24 business hours we are going to refill this steroid pill." Penalties to a pharmacist would be great if prescriptions to a drug were dispensed without proper verification, but with contact lenses it is thought of as harmless.