16 CFR Part 456 ; Agency Information Collection Activities: Review; Comment Request Ophthalmic Practice Rule (Eyeglass Rule): FTC Project No. R511996 #00542

Submission Number:
00542
Commenter:
Scott Schultz
State:
South Carolina
Initiative Name:
16 CFR Part 456 ; Agency Information Collection Activities: Review; Comment Request Ophthalmic Practice Rule (Eyeglass Rule): FTC Project No. R511996
I feel this newly proposed law would inhibit the ability of the patient to receive glasses. What I mean is that many ophthalmologists do not dispense glasses. therefore, we have no need to determine the pupillary distance or other glasses parameters. Therefore, then it would essentially remove the ability of the ophthalmologist (an eye surgeon who when to medical school and is trained to perform refractions) to provide the patient with a refraction and prescription for glasses. unless, of course, the ophthalmologist invests in equipment to accurately determine these measurements- which are unnecessary for providing a glases Rx. In addition, the glasses dispensary would determine these measurements anyway(as they do now) because they will have to stand by their products and will likely repeat the measurements on their own using their own experience, expertise, and equipment, thereby making our determination of such parameters unnecessary. (this is the main reason it is not required now). If the reason is that people want online glasses for the cheap(and don't know their PD), there are online instructions for measuring their own PD. If they do this incorrectly, then that is the risk they take for not utilizing the experience of a local glasses dispensary. "buyer beware." in the end, I cant think of any good reasons to change the current state of glasses prescribing, and feel that this proposed change is unnecessary and only will hinder the patient's options rather than expand them.