The "Sharing" Economy: Issues Facing Platforms, Participants, and Regulators A Federal Trade Commission Workshop #00721

Submission Number:
00721
Commenter:
Maggie Mishin
State:
Washington
Initiative Name:
The "Sharing" Economy: Issues Facing Platforms, Participants, and Regulators A Federal Trade Commission Workshop
Airbnb and the practice of a shared economy puts the power in the individuals hands to stay out of debt. In 2013 I was let go from the company I was working for and it was hard to find another job. Especially since my husband's just was going to end soon due to layoffs and the prospect of us moving from where we were at the time (Reston, VA) was high. I wanted to help make ends meet and so came across the idea of renting part of our home out to nightly travelers. It turned out great. The income that we earned there covered the gap in income and we also got to meet so many great people. I also found out that the cost of our rental or Airbnb was a benefit to us but was also a great help to travelers. 90% of the people we hosted were there on travel. The lower cost of "hotel" helped them out and their small companies. One guest stayed with us every Monday-Thursday for 4 months because of work. If it was not for Airbnb he would have had to move his family from Richmond up to Reston or quit his job. This way he was able to make it work. The second time Airbnb saved the finances in our family is when we moved from Reston, VA to Bellevue WA. I was 8 months pregnant and had been fired from my job back when I was 5 months pregnant due to the pregnancy. I was told that when I went on maternity leave my clients would get mad. And it is hard to get a job looking pregnant so again I was without work and used the Airbnb in our new home to make up part of my income and keep me busy. Giving the citizen an opportunity to do good for their families out of the property they already have is a fantastic way to self sufficient. Unemployment checks were ok but Airbnb was fantastic!