Business Opportunity Rule #522418-12013

Submission Number:
522418-12013
Commenter:
Stephen Ogier
State:
TX
Initiative Name:
Business Opportunity Rule
We are for any regulations that will promote honesty and integrity in business. However, we are against any regulations that invade our privacy or require us to disclose our personal finances or prospect lists to any person we are speaking with. No prospect will register with us if they feel that in order to succeed they must disclose their personal information to strangers. Most of the prospects we meet are new acquaintances. We registered as Quixtar IBOs late in 1999. We had no previous business experience, but the business was presented to us in a professional and thorough manner. We were given all the time and information we needed in order to make the decision. From the first time we heard the opportunity until we registered was at least 3 weeks in length. We understood from the beginning that it was not a "get rich quick" method, but that we would need to learn the business and be taught how to run a business. Since I was medically retired and my wife held a full time teaching job, we knew that it would take time to build the business to the point we wanted. Our goal was and is to provide an income during our retirement years. During the time we have been registered, we have had improved health and have grown spiritually and emotionally by associating with high quality people and reading books that are motivational. inspirational, and educational. We were cautioned from the beginning to honest in all areas- from registering, educating, selling, and paying appropriate taxes. We do the same for anyone that we register. It ususally costs about $100 to $140.00 for people to register with us, and that includes products that are optional for them to purchase. We always read through the contract aloud with propects and give them additional time to consider before actually registering them. However, there are some who wish to register right away and get started immediately. They are encouraged to do this, if that is their desire and we explain that the products they purchase are 100% refundable and they have at least 3 days to change their minds (only a phone call away). We recently had an IBO who bought products for her immediate family within hours of registration and was very excited about the great service, speed of delivery, and quality. She could not have done this under a waiting period rule. Plus, she would have no list to share. Thus, she would be out of business before she started if she had to produce a customer or prospect list at that time. If any regulation is imposed that requires an IBO to wait for a period of several days before a decision could be made, it would hurt us greatly. We have major scheduling problems as it is trying to get together with busy working people with families. If they could not make decisions as they wanted, it could cost us dearly. They could hear our information and then possibly register under someone else because we could not get back with them quickly enough. Also, we consider it an invasion of our privacy to give anyone our exact financial information. We are eager to share corporate results and track records, but we are unwilling to make public our personal affairs. As far as giving a list of our business associates or prospects, that is personal as well. If we gave someone a list of prospects and they knew them better than we, we could lose these prospects to another business after doing all of the work. We have no litigation against us now or in the past, but again, this is not a matter to discuss with a prospect. It is no more appropriate for us to discuss these things than Walmart to discuss litigation against them while we are checking out at the register. We always disclose appropriate information and encourage them to check us out. We hope you will give this serious consideration because our free enterprise system depends on it. Stephen and Phyllis Ogier