Blog Posts Tagged with Privacy

Open Police Data Re-identification Risks

Last week I spoke at a White House event “Opportunities & Challenges: Open Police Data and Ensuring the Safety and Security of Victims of Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault.” This event brought together representatives from government agencies, police departments, and advocacy groups to discuss the potential safety and privacy impact of open police data initiatives.

Four upcoming opportunities to submit your research to the FTC

Researchers, the FTC is interested in hearing from you! Last week we announced our Fall Technology Series on emerging consumer technology issues, and this week we announced our second PrivacyCon event. Both the technology series and PrivacyCon offer opportunities for researchers to submit work that informs questions the FTC is exploring.

Enhancing permissions through contextual integrity

This is the third post in my series on privacy and security in mobile computing, which builds on the Commission’s 2013 mobile security workshop. In my last post, I concluded that – despite a history of usability concerns – permissions in mobile operating systems are clearly an improvement over the opacity of traditional operating systems.

Secure APIs and the principle of least privilege

Editor’s Note: As noted in a previous post, Tech@FTC is expanding to include posts by other technically minded staff at the Commission. This is the first in a series of blog posts by Nithan Sannappa, an attorney in the Division of Privacy and Identity Protection, that will explore several important issues regarding user privacy and security in mobile computing.

What’s the security shelf-life of IoT?

The FTC released a staff report in late January that took a comprehensive look at the emerging “Internet of Things” and security, including secure APIs, authentication, and product updates, was a key theme.

I’d like to briefly explain why I believe IoT security is so important and why the IoT ecosystem presents a unique set of factors that give rise for special attention to security.