Blog Posts Tagged with Data Security

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Developing a health app? Book an appointment with two new compliance resources

If you’re in the process of developing a health-related mobile app, what tools are essential to your success? The answer, according to some entrepreneurs, is innovative code, a great marketing plan, and the number of a take-out that delivers until 2AM. But have you given much thought to legal compliance? A new multi-agency interactive tool may help you determine which federal laws apply to your product.

Announcing the next PrivacyCon

The FTC hosted its first-ever PrivacyCon event on January 14, 2016, to showcase original research in the area of privacy and security research. With over 300 in-person attendees, 1500 virtual attendees watching via webcast, and many more following PrivacyCon on Twitter, the event was a huge success. Participants presented and discussed original research on important and timely topics such as data security, online tracking, consumer perceptions of privacy, privacy disclosures, big data, and the economics of privacy.

Start with Security: Lights, Camera, Action

It’s Red Carpet Season. There isn’t an Academy presenting awards for Two-Minute Videos Most Likely to Help Businesses Start with Security. (The engraving wouldn’t fit on the statuette anyway.)  But if there were, submitted for your consideration are our nominees in ten categories – and the debut of a new production. 

Best short feature.  We’re fans of Start with Security. It explains the basics of building security into the culture of your company.

ASUS case suggests 6 things to watch for in the Internet of Things

The router is Grand Central Station for home technology. It manages the connections between all of the smart devices in the home, from the computer in the den and tablet on the coffee table, to the smart thermostat on the wall and internet-connected baby monitor in the nursery. Consumers expect that route to be a limited access highway with the router forwarding data securely while blocking unauthorized access.

IdentityTheft.gov means business!

Why is it your business if identity theft victims can get free personal recovery plans and other help that makes it easier for them to report and recover from identity theft?  Here’s an answer: Because it’s good business – for you, your customers, your employees, and your community.

PrivacyCon set to convene

Experts from around the world have gathered today at PrivacyCon, the FTC’s first-ever confab to discuss the latest in consumer privacy and data security. And it’s much more than just talk. Leading academics and other experts will present new research on five key topics: the state of online privacy, consumer expectations, big data, the economics of privacy and security, and security and usability.

Why big data is a big deal

For a while now, pundits have been talking about the three V’s of big data: Volume – the vast quantity of information that can be gathered and analyzed; Velocity – the speed with which companies can accumulate, analyze, and use new data; and Variety – the breadth of data companies can analyze effectively.

FTC takes on toothless encryption claims for dental practice software

When a company promises to encrypt dentists’ patient data, but fails to live up to established standards, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the FTC would bristle. A $250,000 proposed settlement with Henry Schein Practice Solutions, Inc., and a new FTC video remind companies to brush up on security-related data hygiene.

Oracle Java SE case serves up a cuppa caution

When consumers updated Java SE, which has been installed on more than 850 million computers, Oracle Corporation promised “safe and secure access to the world of amazing Java content” and stated that the updates had “the latest . . . security improvements.” But according to a settlement just announced by the FTC, when it came to those security updates, Java SE was pouring decaf.

FTC’s $100 million settlement with LifeLock: May (en)force be with you

The law may not authorize the use of light sabers, but to protect consumers and ensure that companies comply with existing orders, the FTC will use the forces within its power. It’s a lock that the agency’s $100 million settlement with LifeLock – one of the largest redress orders of its kind – makes that point as big as life.

Wyndham’s settlement with the FTC: What it means for businesses – and consumers

Data security watchers read with interest the United States Court of Appeals’ decision earlier this year in FTC v. Wyndham, upholding the FTC’s authority to challenge allegedly lax data security practices under the unfairness prong of the FTC Act. We view that ruling as a milestone victory for consumers and for companies of all sizes that are committed to keeping customers’ personal information secure.

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