Blog Posts Tagged with Consumer Privacy

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A closer look at the Myspace Order: Part 2

Social network site Myspace promised users it wouldn’t share their personally identifiable information in a way that was inconsistent with the reason people provided the info, without first notifying them and getting their approval. The company also said that information used to customize ads wouldn’t identify people to third parties and that Myspace wouldn’t share browsing activity that wasn’t anonymous.

FTC's Myspace case: Part 1

Have you reviewed your company’s privacy policy lately? The FTC’s proposed settlement with social network Myspace serves as a timely reminder to make sure what you tell people about your privacy practices lines up with what actually happens in the day-to-day operation of your business. While you’re at it, double-check to make sure you’re giving customers the straight story about third-party access to their information.

Close-up on disclosures

The FTC just released the preliminary agenda for the May 30, 2012, workshop to consider the need for new guidance for online advertisers about making disclosures. If that’s a topic of interest to your business (and it’s tough to imagine a company not involved in those discussions), you’ll want to stay up on the latest. What’s on the schedule for May 30th? After a kick-off presentation on usability research, the workshop will feature four panels: 9:30 – Panel 1: Universal and Cross-Platform Advertising Disclosures

6(b) or not 6(b): That is the question

Does the IRS have a Form 1039?  Do drivers ever get their kicks on Route 67?  And does 3.14158 ever feel unappreciated because pi gets all the attention?

Most attorneys and business executives are familiar with Section 5 of the FTC Act, which outlaws unfair or deceptive trade practices.  But Section 6 also plays a critical role in protecting consumers.  Specifically, Section 6(b) authorizes the FTC to get information from companies — “special reports” — about certain aspects of their business.

Paper, Plastic . . . or Mobile? FTC announces agenda for April 26th workshop

Mobile devices are changing how people go about their daily lives, and that includes how they pay for stuff. As announced in January, the FTC is hosting a workshop on April 26, 2012, to examine the use of mobile payments in the marketplace and their effects on consumers. The workshop — which will be held at the FTC’s Conference Center at 601 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., in Washington, D.C. — is free and open to the public.  The agenda is now available.

FTC releases Privacy Report

In a world of smart phones and smart grids, the smart money is on companies that play it smart with consumers’ information.  Consistent with its 40 years’ experience protecting consumer privacy, the FTC’s just-released Report — Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change:  Recommendations for Businesses and Policymakers — underscores that message and outlines a new privacy framework designed for the

Fast forward

Dot Com Disclosures — the FTC’s staff publication about online advertising — was published 12 years ago. Of course, the same basic consumer protection principles apply online, in mobile marketing, and in other media, but a lot has happened since then.  In light of technological changes, is it time for revised guidance about making disclosures required by FTC law?

Keeping Upromises

Upromise offers users a service where they can save for college by getting rebates when they buy merchandise from participating retailers. But as the FTC charged in a recent law enforcement settlement, when it comes to consumer privacy and data security, the college savings membership program may want to consider a refresher course.

Present perfect

This time of year retailers look forward to the sweet harmony of silver bells, laughing voices, and the cha-ching of registers. Here are some steps you can take to ensure a happier holiday for your business — and your customers.

Lessons from the Facebook settlement (even if you’re not Facebook)

The terms of the FTC’s proposed settlement apply only to Facebook. But to paraphrase noted legal scholar Bob Dylan, companies that want to stay off the law enforcement radar don’t need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows. What practical pointers can your business take from the Facebook case and other recent FTC actions dealing with consumer privacy?

Facebook’s future: What the FTC order means for consumer privacy

The FTC’s complaint against Facebook outlines eight separate areas where the FTC says Facebook’s privacy practices were deceptive or unfair. What provisions does the proposed order put in place to protect people in the future?

One key provision is a broad ban on deception. Facebook can’t misrepresent the privacy or security protections that apply to any “covered information.” The order defines that as information “from or about” an individual consumer like:

New privacy system for movement of consumer data between US & Asia-Pacific economies

If your company does business in the Asia-Pacific region — or if you work with clients from that part of the global economy — you’ll want to follow recent developments in the privacy arena. This week, the FTC welcomed the approval by the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum (APEC) of a new initiative to harmonize cross-border data privacy protection among members of APEC.

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