Blog Posts Tagged with Privacy and Security

Pages

In praise of Toby Flenderson

HR could use better PR.   Say "human resources" and some people think of Dunder Mifflin’s joy-deficient Toby Flenderson from "The Office."  But you know better and appreciate the job your HR team does to keep your organization up and running.  They're also a critical line of defense between your company and the onslaught of data thieves and scammers.  The BCP Business Center has a special page to make their job a little easier.

FTC lodges complaint against Wyndham

The FTC's law enforcement action against hotel company Wyndham Worldwide Corporation and three of its subsidiaries alleges that a series of security breaches — three within two years — resulted in fraudulent charges, millions of dollars in fraud loss, and the export of hundreds of thousands of people's account information to an Internet domain address registered in Russia.  According to the lawsuit, a number of the defendants' practices, taken together, unreasonably and unnecessarily exposed consumers' personal data, including their cred

Older Americans and ID Theft: When It Hits Home

When it comes to identity theft, older Americans face unique risks.  While all age groups may be vulnerable, older consumers are more likely to have to share personal data with doctors, hospitals, lawyers, financial advisors, and others.  Some may face physical limitations or health challenges that could make it more difficult to safeguard their information — like securing decades of financial paperwork or managing the learning curve as life moves online.  How does this issue affect you?  As the business person or attorney in the family, your relatives may look to you to take the lead in se

Speaking of Spokeo: Part 2 — The company’s allegedly bogus endorsements

The lawsuit against data broker Spokeo is the FTC’s first Fair Credit Reporting Act case addressing the collection of online info — including data from social networking sites — when used in the context of employment screening.  But that’s not the only way the Spokeo settlement touches on social media.  The FTC also charged that Spokeo violated Section 5 by having employees post glowing recommendations of the company’s services on news and technology websites without di

Speaking of Spokeo: Part 1

Like chicken and waffles or ham and pineapple on pizza, some combos don’t sound like they’d go together, but make sense once you find out more.  Put the FTC’s settlement with Spokeo on that list.  According to the FTC, data broker Spokeo violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act and used deceptive endorsements in violation of Section 5.  A closer look at the pleadings explains how those two hot topics found their way into one FTC complaint.

Peer pressure

You wouldn’t post customers’ Social Security numbers on your website or stand on the street distributing handbills with hospital patients’ medical information.  But if there is improperly configured peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing software on a company computer, the result could be about the same.  That’s why two FTC settlements deserve your attention.

A closer look at the Myspace Order: Part 2

Social network site Myspace promised users it wouldn’t share their personally identifiable information in a way that was inconsistent with the reason people provided the info, without first notifying them and getting their approval. The company also said that information used to customize ads wouldn’t identify people to third parties and that Myspace wouldn’t share browsing activity that wasn’t anonymous.

FTC's Myspace case: Part 1

Have you reviewed your company’s privacy policy lately? The FTC’s proposed settlement with social network Myspace serves as a timely reminder to make sure what you tell people about your privacy practices lines up with what actually happens in the day-to-day operation of your business. While you’re at it, double-check to make sure you’re giving customers the straight story about third-party access to their information.

Close-up on disclosures

The FTC just released the preliminary agenda for the May 30, 2012, workshop to consider the need for new guidance for online advertisers about making disclosures. If that’s a topic of interest to your business (and it’s tough to imagine a company not involved in those discussions), you’ll want to stay up on the latest. What’s on the schedule for May 30th? After a kick-off presentation on usability research, the workshop will feature four panels: 9:30 – Panel 1: Universal and Cross-Platform Advertising Disclosures

6(b) or not 6(b): That is the question

Does the IRS have a Form 1039?  Do drivers ever get their kicks on Route 67?  And does 3.14158 ever feel unappreciated because pi gets all the attention?

Most attorneys and business executives are familiar with Section 5 of the FTC Act, which outlaws unfair or deceptive trade practices.  But Section 6 also plays a critical role in protecting consumers.  Specifically, Section 6(b) authorizes the FTC to get information from companies — “special reports” — about certain aspects of their business.

Paper, Plastic . . . or Mobile? FTC announces agenda for April 26th workshop

Mobile devices are changing how people go about their daily lives, and that includes how they pay for stuff. As announced in January, the FTC is hosting a workshop on April 26, 2012, to examine the use of mobile payments in the marketplace and their effects on consumers. The workshop — which will be held at the FTC’s Conference Center at 601 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., in Washington, D.C. — is free and open to the public.  The agenda is now available.

Financial literacy makes good business $en$e

Imagine for a moment your ideal customer.  They consider their choices carefully before buying.  They keep their accounts current.  When service is top-notch, they spread the word to friends and family.  If there’s a glitch, they give you a chance to correct the problem before posting thumbs-down reviews.  Now imagine you could “create” your own cadre of contented customers.  Fantasy Land?  It’s more real than you might imagine.

Data security & COPPA: RockYou like a hurricane

Are there hotter topics these days than data security and kids’ privacy?  An FTC law enforcement settlement with the social networking site RockYou ticks both of those topical boxes and challenges a course of conduct the FTC says made it easier for hackers to access the personal information of 32 million users.  The complaint also alleges the company collected info from kids in violation of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act.

Pages