Blog Posts Tagged with Health Claims

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First FTC ROSCA case challenges bogus BOGO and "free" claims

It’s called ROSCA – the Restore Online Shoppers’ Confidence Act – and it prohibits marketers from charging consumers for an online transaction unless the marketer has clearly disclosed all material terms of the deal and received the consumer’s express informed consent. Your e-commerce clients will want to know about the FTC’s first ROSCA case, filed recently in Nevada.

“High School Skinny” claims are thin on proof

“Get High School Skinny!”  That was one pitch Georgia-based HealthyLife Sciences made for its Healthe Trim line of diet products.  The company’s radio ads, TV commercials, and website promised it all.  Just a couple of capsules in the morning would burn fat, boost metabolism, and suppress the appetite, leading to the fast and easy loss of as much as 19 pounds the first week.  But according to a proposed FTC settlement, the real result was the fast and easy loss of b

Wake up and smell the coffee

Just as Helen of Troy has gone down in history as The Face that Launched a Thousand Ships, a seriously flawed study purporting to show that green coffee bean extract is scientifically proven to cause weight loss may be remembered as The Fake that Launched a Thousand Slips.  An FTC settlement with Applied Food Sciences, Inc. – whose ingredient has been promoted everywhere from diet pill ads to The Dr.

From the sports page to the front page

For some athletes and fans, September is the equivalent of the start of the sports “new year.” From the FTC’s perspective, it’s a good time to remind retailers that they need appropriate proof to support concussion protection claims for athletic mouthguards. That’s why FTC staff has sent letters to five major retailers, alerting them to concerns about what they’re promising on their websites.

David Mamet didn’t write the dialogue in this $40 million court order. It just sounds that way.

"A-B-C. Always be closing."

"As you all know, first prize is a Cadillac El Dorado. Second prize is a set of steak knives. Third prize is you're fired."

"These are the new leads. The Glengarry leads. To you, they're gold. But you don't get them. Why? Because they're for closers."

FTC to L’Oréal: Scientific claims need proof that’s more than just skin deep

When ads for beauty products convey subjective claims – for example, L’Oréal’s long-standing “Because I’m worth it” tagline – it’s unlikely consumers would think statements like that are supported by science.  (It’s hard to imagine a testing protocol that could establish whether or not we’re worth it.)  But flip through a magazine and it’s apparent that test tubes are overtaking powder puffs in how some cosmetics are marketed.  When companies tout the scientific research behind their advertising or say their products have been “clinically proven,” those claims – like any other objective rep

Fighting on three fronts: FTC weighs in on weight loss ads

Why do companies sell “miracle” diet pills and potions, promising results that defy the laws of physics?  Why do consumers buy them?  And what is the FTC doing about it?  Those are just some of the topics on the agenda at a congressional hearing today.  If you have clients that sell weight loss products or if you represent media outlets that run those ads, you’ll want to

Where did I put those keys?

If it hasn’t happened yet, it’s only a matter of time.  You walk into a room – say, to get your sunglasses – and then can’t remember why you’re there.  So it’s no wonder that claims for BrainStrong Adult, a dietary supplement advertised on TV, online, and through an active social media presence, caught consumers’ eye.  Ads said that Brain Strong Adult “helps protect against normal cognitive decline as we age” and is “clinically shown to improve memory.”  But acco

Time for a gut check?

Like the swallows returning to Capistrano and the umpire yelling “Play ball!” on Opening Day, there’s another inevitable harbinger of spring:  ads for bogus products promising easy weight loss just in time for bathing suit season.  But this year, media outlets have a new tool for spotting false claims before they’re published or aired – and before consumers risk their money (and maybe even their health) on a worthless pill, potion, belt, cream, or whatever.  If you or your clients run ads for weight loss products, it’s time for a gut check.

Do you sell health products? Court opinion offers truth-in-advertising recap

Advertisers that sell health products should know the legal standards by now, but to those resistant to the message, a federal judge in California spelled them out again in a $2.2 million judgment against the marketers of two diabetes products – Diabetic Pack and Insulin Resistance Pack.

FTC to advertisers: 7 New Year's resolutions

Sprinkle it on food.  Slather it on skin.  Place drops under the tongue.  Regardless of how consumers use your product, if you make weight loss claims, here’s a New Year’s resolution to consider:  Make sure you have sound science to support what you say.  That’s just one message marketers can take from FTC actions against Sensa, L’Occitane, HCG Diet Direct, and LeanSpa, settlements that will return big money back to consumers – including $26.5 million to peopl

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