Business Blog

Food for thought

When browsing for a riveting read at the local bookstore, you might pick up a John Grisham or dive into a Stieg Larsson.  Unlike those best sellers, one author’s name that might not jump off the jacket is “Interagency Working Group.”  But in the case of the Interagency Working Group on Food Marketed to Children’s hot-off-the-presses Preliminary Proposed Nutrition Principles to Guide Industry Self-Regulatory Efforts (try tweeting that) you really can’t judge a book by its cover.

Debt Collection 2.0

Cell phones, email, social media, auto-dialers, databases, and payment portals.  This ain’t your Father’s debt collection business.  That’s why an April 28, 2011, FTC workshop, Debt Collection 2.0:  Protecting Consumers as Technologies Change, will focus on the impact developments like these are having on the consumer debt collection system.  As the agenda shows, the conversation will center on how technologies affect debt collectors’ compliance with the law and the consumer protection concerns these new methods

Won't get fauxed again

If you haven’t seen the ads, you’ve probably been too busy listening to eight-tracks and playing Pong because billions — with a capital B — have been served up online. They look like news investigations about acai berry weight loss products conducted by independent journalists for reputable news outlets featuring the logos of national media and follow-up comments by satisfied consumers.

Cleaning up ad claims

Science, studies, and statistics. There’s a reason advertisers feature them so prominently. When used accurately, they can be powerful tools for distinguishing your product from the competitors. But scientific claims — especially health-related ones — need solid proof.

The FTC's settlement with Google: Part 4

Business practices at odds with promises in the company’s privacy policy. The failure to disclose adequately that the contacts with whom users emailed and chatted the most would become public by default. Confusing and hard-to-find controls to limit the sharing of personal info. False claims about adherence to the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor privacy framework.

Those were the allegations in the FTC’s complaint against Google. What changes will the agency’s proposed settlement bring about at the company?

Workshop to examine lottery, other money transfer scams

It may have happened to an employee, one of your customers, or a member of your family.  Someone calls to report “You’re a winner!” of a foreign lottery.  To collect, all they have to do is wire money to cover the taxes and fees.  Or the caller impersonates a grandchild or other friend-in-need and says they’re desperate to have money wired now.  Both are examples of the elaborate schemes scam artists have come up with to try to convince people to wire cash to someone they don’t know.

The FTC’s settlement with Google: Part 2

According to the FTC’s recent settlement with Google, when people declined to sign up for Google Buzz, the company’s new social network, Google nonetheless enrolled them in certain features without their consent.

But what about people who clicked the link that said “Sweet! Check out Buzz”?  The FTC’s complaint alleged that they, too, weren’t adequately informed that certain information that had been private — including the people they chatted with or emailed most often — would be shared publicly by default.

Hacked Off by an Email Data Breach?

According to news reports, hackers recently accessed the database of Epsilon, a large marketing company that sends emails on behalf of banks, stores and other businesses.  Was your company an Epsilon client?  If so, the stolen information could make it easier for crooks to send emails that appear to be from your brand.

Here are a few things you can do to help your customers avoid a phishing attack that abuses your brand.

Welcome to Consumer University

As your customers' buying habits make clear, today’s consumer marketplace knows no borders.  That’s why the FTC and officials from nine Latin American countries are meeting in Washington, D.C., this week to consider the challenges of global consumer protection.

Creepy little blood suckers

No, not those unpleasant former colleagues, but the resurgent bane of the business traveler:  bedbugs.

Bedbugs are coming out of the woodwork — followed closely by opportunists peddling iffy products aimed at on-the-go professionals.  Although bedbugs don't carry disease, their bites can cause itchy, annoying welts.  But before you shell out money for an unproven remedy, find out more about what will (and won't) protect you from these pests when you travel.

Ladies and gentlemen, start your engines

Do you work in the motor vehicle industry or follow what’s going on in that sector?  Then today’s announcement from the FTC about a series of workshops on consumer protection issues related to the sale, financing, and leasing of cars, SUVs, and light trucks is right up your alley.  The first roundtable, set for April 12th at Wayne State Law School in Detroit, is free and open to the public.  And what better place to rev up a discussion about motor vehicles than in the Motor City?

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