Free cybersecurity webinars for tax professionals

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Tax professionals are prime targets for identity thieves. Why? Your clients’ information — bank and investment accounts, Social Security numbers, medical records, and more — can be a virtual goldmine in the wrong hands. That’s why securing it against a data breach is critical to protect your clients and your business.

On Wednesday, August 23, experts from the IRS, FTC, and the National Association of Tax Professionals (NATP) will discuss cybersecurity for tax professionals in the second of four free webinars. The series covers the NIST Cybersecurity Framework — guidelines that the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology developed to help organizations identify, assess, and manage cybersecurity risks. The webinars track the NIST core principles of Identify, Protect, Detect, Respond, and Recover.

In Cybersecurity for Tax Professionals – Part 2: Protect, we’ll look at access control, secure data storage, protecting data during transmission, remote access, and securing paper, physical media, and devices. Register at the NATP website.

If you missed Part 1: Identify — focused on recognizing data security vulnerabilities that tax professionals face — you can view it on-demand. And, plan now to join us for Part 3: Detect, on Wednesday, October 4, and Part 4: Respond and Recover, on Wednesday, November 15. All the webinars are free, and you can earn a CPE credit for each webinar you attend.

To learn more, check out our blog and video explaining how the NIST Cybersecurity Framework relates to the FTC’s work on data security.

One last thing: the webinars are designed for tax professionals but, just as all businesses need to be thinking about cybersecurity, all are welcome to join the webinars.

Comments

How do you register for the 8/23 webinar.?

Where do you get Part 1 on demand?

Missed Part I

Sounds like a plan

Thanks but it is very complicated to understand the system internet because unfortunately we are facing a system full of fraud

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