Connected, collected, protected? FTC-NHTSA event explores drive toward connected cars

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In the 80s, the appropriately-named group The Cars asked the musical question, “Who’s gonna drive you home?” The FTC and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are hosting a workshop on June 28, 2017, to examine the consumer privacy and security implications of automated and connected motor vehicles. The questions won’t be of the musical variety, but we have a list of them and welcome your input.

Car buyers are looking for more than just multiple cup holders these days. Innovative technologies can monitor and warn drivers of potential hazards and even provide some assistance with tasks such as with braking or steering. Other technologies keep passengers entertained during long car rides. And then there are the prospects of automated vehicles or cars with vehicle-to-vehicle communications technology that could revolutionize the trip from Point A to Point B.

But there are privacy and security considerations, too. It’s likely that cars with these technologies will generate a truckload of data, including sensitive information like geolocation and what’s being said when drivers connect their smartphones to a car’s computer system. That’s what the FTC, NHTSA, academics, consumer advocates, and industry representatives will discuss on June 28th.

FTC Acting Chairman Ohlhausen will lead off the day. The workshop will explore the consumer privacy and security issues that automated and connected vehicles pose, including:

  • the types of data vehicles with wireless interfaces collect, store, transmit, and share;
  • the potential benefits and challenges posed by data collection; and
  • the respective roles of car manufacturers, government agencies, and self-regulation when it comes to privacy and security in this sector.

Before we announce the final agenda, we’d like hear how you would frame the issues. This notice lists suggested questions and explains the process for filing comments by April 20th.

The event, which is free and open to the public, will be at the FTC’s Constitution Center, 400 7th St., S.W., Washington, DC, at the L’Enfant Plaza Metro Station. We’ll be webcasting it, too.

Visit the event page for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

Connected cars as part of the broader IoT (Internet of Things and Identity of Things) must have a "trust economy" in place. Today secure, authorized authentication to the vehicle its CAN, ECU and other sub-systems is in its infancy. Consumers and regulators must have assurances that a vehicle is hardened sufficiently from a cybersecurity perspective. Second, consumers must have a high degree of assurance that their privacy is maintained and the vehicle does not become an unintended pathway and instrumentality to the loss of personal data.

Would users have the opportunity to select options for participating in data collection. I prefer that not be mandatory on my private vehicle. If this is part of rental vehicle practices as a best practice, what happens when that vehicle is sold or transferred to another owner? also how will that affect private owner sale? I see this as major problem as identity theft door opener.

Would users have the opportunity to select options for participating in data collection. I prefer that not be mandatory on my private vehicle. If this is part of rental vehicle practices as a best practice, what happens when that vehicle is sold or transferred to another owner? also how will that affect private owner sale? I see this as major problem as identity theft door open

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