Tag: Consumer Protection

Displaying 2261 - 2280 of 3975 results.

As back-to-school time approaches, children may be thinking about meeting up with friends to share stories about their summer adventures.  But when it comes to personal information, parents and kids need to be careful about sharing too much.  These days the casual use of sensitive...
The Federal Trade Commission filed an amicus brief in the phone bill cramming case Moore v. Verizon Communications, Inc. (No. 2 CV 09-1823 SBA) before the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, opposing a proposed class action settlement of the case because it is not fair,...
Whether you’re a full-pads athlete or a quarterback of the Monday morning variety, you’ve read reports about sports-related concussions.  But before marketing a product advertised to reduce the risk of those injuries, businesses should take a careful look at the FTC’s settlement with...
The Federal Trade Commission, the Department of Justice, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau filed a joint amicus brief in the U.S. Supreme Court supporting consumers’ ability to protect their rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act by suing debt collectors.  The FTC and CFPB...
In a settlement reached with the Federal Trade Commission, mouthguard marketer Brain-Pad, Inc.
When it comes to the FTC’s Jewelry Guides, we’re looking for your pearls of wisdom, your sterling opinions, and other flawless feedback about how the standards affect consumers and businesses.  Back in June, we told you that the Jewelry Guides were getting another look as part of the...
Do you have something to say about jewelry and how it’s marketed?  If so, the Federal Trade Commission wants to hear from you, and is extending the deadline for filing public comments on the agency’s Jewelry Guides.
Have you purchased Disney- or Marvel Hero-themed vitamins for your kids during the last few years – vitamins that featured characters such as the Disney Princesses, Winnie the Pooh, Finding Nemo, and Spider-Man?  If so, the Federal Trade Commission wants you to know that you may be due a refund....
After two weeks of talk about track, the trending topic is tracking, including the FTC’s $22.5 million settlement with Google for violating an earlier order.  Google told users of the Safari browser it wouldn’t place tracking cookies or serve them targeted ads, but the FTC charged...
The Federal Trade Commission is mailing 9,282 refund checks to consumers who were deceived by false promises that they could earn substantial income if they bought and followed the "Stefanchik Program" to buy and sell privately held promissory notes and mortgages. The FTC alleged that claims made...
Following a public comment period, the FTC has accepted as final a settlement with Facebook resolving charges that Facebook deceived consumers by telling them they could keep their information on Facebook private, and then repeatedly allowing it to be shared and made public.
There’s been a lot of talk about breaking records these past few weeks.  But here’s one you won’t see on the sports pages:  the FTC’s $22.5 million settlement with Google, the largest civil penalty ever against a single defendant.  The penalty stems from FTC charges that Google didn’...
WHAT: Telephone Press Conference to respond to questions about the FTC's $22.5 million settlement with Google. WHO: David Vladeck, Director, Bureau of Consumer Protection James Kohm, Associate Director for Enforcement Federal Trade Commission
The Federal Trade Commission mailed more than 13,000 refund checks to consumers who were allegedly deceived by a company that claimed it would negotiate with lenders to modify the consumers' mortgages and make them more affordable. To resolve FTC charges, First Universal Lending and its owners...
Google Inc. has agreed to pay a record $22.5 million civil penalty to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that it misrepresented to users of Apple Inc.’s Safari Internet browser that it would not place tracking “cookies” or serve targeted ads to those users, violating an earlier privacy...
An employment background screening company that provides consumer reports to companies nationwide will pay $2.6 million to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that it violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act by failing to use reasonable procedures to assure the maximum possible accuracy of...

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