Statutes Enforced or Administered by the Commission

The Commission has enforcement or administrative responsibilities under more than 70 laws. The agency’s primary statutes, the Federal Trade Commission Act and the Clayton Act, appear first followed by all of the other statutes in alphabetical order. The links for the statutes primarily are to uscode.house.gov, which updates the statutes on a regular basis. Please note, however, that the FTC cannot guarantee the accuracy of any particular statute or statute link at any particular time.

Displaying 61 - 71 of 71

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Sports Agent Responsibility and Trust Act

Mission:

Consumer Protection

Law:

15 U.S.C. § 7801-7807

This Act prohibits certain conduct by sports agents relating to the signing of contracts with student athletes. It makes it unlawful for an agent to directly or indirectly recruit a student athlete by giving any false or misleading information, making a false promise or representation, or providing anything of value to a student athlete, or anyone associated with the athlete, before he or she has entered into an agency contract.

Standards Development Organization Act of 2004

Mission:

Competition

Law:

15 U.S.C. §§ 4301-4306

This Act amends the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993 to extend the same antitrust protections to standards development organizations (SDOs) while those organizations are engaged in standards development activity. The Act provides that the antitrust rule of reason applies to SDOs while they are engaged in standards development activities.

Telemarketing and Consumer Fraud and Abuse Prevention Act

Mission:

Consumer Protection

Law:

15 U.S.C. §§ 6101-6108

The Act, as amended, requires the Commission to promulgate regulations (a) defining and prohibiting deceptive telemarketing acts or practices; (b) prohibiting telemarketers from engaging in a pattern of unsolicited telephone calls that a reasonable consumer would consider coercive or an invasion of privacy; (c) restricting the hours of the day and night when unsolicited telephone calls may be made to consumers; and (d) requiring disclosure of the nature of the call at the start of an unsolicited call made to sell goods or services. Laws specifically related to Do-Not-Call and to charitable solicitations are listed separately.

Telephone Disclosure and Dispute Resolution Act of 1992

Mission:

Consumer Protection

Law:

15 U.S.C. §§ 5701-5724

The Act requires the Commission to promulgate certain regulations respecting advertising for, operation of, and billing and collection procedures for, pay-per-call or "900 number" telephone services. The regulations must include certain provisions, such as price disclosure requirements, mandatory warnings on services directed to children, and required disclosures in billing statements. The Act also directs the Commission to promulgate a regulation extending to pay-per-call services the billing dispute provisions of the Fair Credit Billing Act. Section 701(b)(1) of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, amended this Act to authorize the Commission to extend the definition of "pay-per-call service" to "other similar services providing audio information or audio entertainment if the Commission determines such services are susceptible to the unfair and deceptive practices" prohibited by these rules.

Textile Fiber Products Identification Act

Mission:

Consumer Protection

Law:

15 U.S.C. §§ 70-70k, as amended

This Act deals with mandatory content disclosure in the labeling, invoicing, and advertising of textile fiber products. Under the Act, misbranding is unlawful under the FTC Act, as is falsely or deceptively invoicing or advertising textile fiber products. The Act also directs the Commission to establish a generic name for each man-made fiber that does not as yet have such a name.

Truth in Lending Act

Mission:

Consumer Protection

Law:

15 U.S.C. §§ 1601-1667f, as amended

This Act (Title I of the Consumer Credit Protection Act) authorizes the Commission to enforce compliance by most non-depository entities with a variety of statutory provisions. Among other requirements, the Act requires creditors who deal with consumers to make certain written disclosures concerning finance charges and related aspects of credit transactions (including disclosing an annual percentage rate) and comply with other mandates, and requires advertisements to include certain disclosures. The Act has been amended on numerous occasions, adding requirements for credit cards and open-end credit; for mortgage credit such as ability to repay standards, loan origination, anti-steering, appraisal independence, and mortgage servicing; and others. A number of laws amending and enforced under this Act are listed separately.

U.S. Safe Web Act

Mission:

Competition

Consumer Protection

Law:

Pub. L. No. 109-455, 120 Stat. 3372, extended by Pub. L. No. 112-203, 126 Stat. 1484, codified at 15 U.S.C. §§ 41 et seq.

This Act, amending the FTC Act, provides the FTC with a number of tools to improve enforcement regarding consumer protection matters, particularly those with an international dimension, including increased cooperation with foreign law enforcement authorities through confidential information sharing and provision of investigative assistance. The Act also allows enhanced staff exchanges and other international cooperative efforts.

Congress reauthorized the SAFE Web Act in 2012. See Public L. No. 112-203, 126 Stat. 1484.

Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act

Mission:

Consumer Protection

Law:

Pub. L. No. 109–347, 120 Stat. 1952 (2006), codified in relevant part at 31 U.S.C. §§ 5361- 5367

This Act prohibits any person engaged in the business of betting, as defined, from knowingly accepting credit, electronic fund transfers, checks, or any other payment involving a financial institution to settle unlawful internet gambling debts. The Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve Board must develop jointly and prescribe regulations requiring payment systems to identify and block or otherwise prevent or prohibit the acceptance of payment for internet gambling transactions.

Webb-Pomerene Act

Mission:

Competition

Law:

15 U.S.C. §§ 61-68

Under this Act, the Commission is responsible for receiving certain filings from export trade associations organized under the Act; investigating association operations that may adversely affect competition within the United States; making recommendations to associations for business readjustments deemed necessary to comply with the law; and, where appropriate, making recommendations to the Attorney General for law enforcement action.

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