Tag: Small Business

Displaying 121 - 140 of 214 results.

Pages

The FTC is mailing refund checks totaling more than $2.6 million to small businesses who lost money to a New York-based office supply scam operated by a business known as A-1 Janitorial.
The Federal Trade Commission and the Arizona Attorney General’s Office invite you to attend the Arizona “Opening Doors to Opportunity” Conference. Conference participants will share experiences and challenges, make connections, and discuss how groups can better collaborate and share...
The FTC’s Western Region-San Francisco is hosting this half-day event, which will focus on Federal Trade Commission basics that every small business should know, with a focus on issues relevant to start-ups and tech companies. FTC staff members will discuss topics such as an intro to...
You’ve read recent news stories about a vulnerability discovered in the WPA2 encryption standard. (Some reports refer to it as KRACK – Key Reinstallation Attack.) Should this be of concern to your business? Yes. Does it warrant further action at your company? Absolutely.
You’ve heard about the “dark web” and wondered how it affects businesses – including small businesses. That was one of the topics addressed at an FTC conference earlier this year on identity theft. Recent headlines about high-profile data breaches have added even more urgency to the...
In our Stick with Security blog series, we’ve done our best to dive deeper into data security by focusing on the lessons learned from recent cases, insights from closed investigations, and the questions and comments we’ve received from businesses.
For businesses, the key to safeguarding sensitive information is to start with security. The Start with Security brochure and videos released in 2015 offer practical tips to take from the FTC’s 60+ data security cases.
If you own a small business or work for one, you’re probably concerned with protecting your business’ data. You want to make sure that sensitive information isn’t accidentally deleted, turned over to a scammer, or hacked. So this week, during National Cybersecurity Awareness Month,...
High-profile hackers grab the headlines. But some data thieves prefer old school methods – rifling through file cabinets, pinching paperwork, and pilfering devices like smartphones and flash drives. As your business bolsters the security of your network, don’t let that take attention...
Recent headlines offer a reminder that no business is immune from cyberattack. If you’re a tax professional, the sensitive information you handle makes you a particularly appealing target. Find out how to reduce your cyber risk at a free webinar for tax professionals.
It sounds like there was some “inventing” going on at Florida-based invention promotion firm World Patent Marketing, but a Preliminary Injunction in a case brought by the FTC suggests it wasn’t the kind that unsuspecting consumers bargained for when they forked over millions of...
Ask a business person where their office is located and the likely answer is “everywhere.” They’re working from home, staying in the loop while traveling, and catching up on email between sales calls. For productivity’s sake, many companies give their employees – and perhaps clients...
Who’s coming in and what’s going out? Businesses that want to stick with security build commonsense monitoring into their brick-and-mortar operations. Whether it’s a key card reader at the door or a burglar alarm activated at night, careful companies keep an eye on entrances and exits...
Tax professionals are prime targets for identity thieves. Why? Your clients’ information — bank and investment accounts, Social Security numbers, medical records, and more — can be a virtual goldmine in the wrong hands. That’s why securing it against a data breach is critical to...
To make it harder for hackers to bluff their way onto a computer network, careful companies follow the advice of Start with Security and require strong authentication practices.
When it comes to data security, what’s reasonable will depend on the size and nature of your business and the kind of data you deal with. But certain principles apply across the board: Don’t collect sensitive information you don’t need. Protect the information you maintain. And train...

Pages