Tag: Environmental Marketing

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Following a public comment period, the Federal Trade Commission has approved a final consent order settling charges that Down to Earth Designs, Inc. made deceptive environmental claims for its gDiapers diaper system, which includes a reusable outer shell (gPants) and disposable pad inner liners (...
Not every building project starts with an ax-wielding guy in a flannel shirt yelling “tim-berrrr!”  Consumers have another choice these days:  plastic lumber, which is often used in decking, fences, outdoor furniture, etc.  Wisconsin-based N.E.W.
A Wisconsin-based manufacturer of plastic lumber products has agreed to stop making allegedly unsubstantiated claims about the recycled content and recyclability of two of its brands of plastic lumber. Under the FTC settlement, the company, N.E.W. Plastics Corp., must have credible evidence to...
When did a light bulb become the symbol of a good idea?  We don’t know, but a ruling in the FTC’s lawsuit against Lights of America – including a $21 million order mandating refunds for consumers and some bookmark-worthy notable quotes from the Court – should serve as a light bulb...
What do dirty diapers and deceptive ads have in common?  (We’ll pause a moment so you can add your own punch line.)  Now that’s out of the way, the action against Portland-based Down to Earth Designs – consumers know them as gDiapers – is the FTC's latest effort to ensure the...
Portland, Oregon-based Down to Earth Designs, Inc., which does business as gDiapers, has settled Federal Trade Commission charges that it made deceptive claims about its products’ biodegradability, compostability, and other environmentally friendly attributes.
Following a public comment period, the Federal Trade Commission has approved three final orders settling charges that Clear Choice Housewares, Inc.; Carnie Cap, Inc.; and MacNeill Engineering Company, doing business as CHAMP, violated the FTC Act by misrepresenting that plastic products they sell...
Under a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission, the marketers of a fuel additive called EnviroTabs will pay $800,000 for consumer redress and are prohibited from making false, misleading, or unsubstantiated claims that EnviroTabs, when added to any type of fuel, will increase fuel efficiency...
Green Foot Global said its EnviroTabs fuel additive was “the world’s 1st multi-vitamin for your engine.”  A lawsuit filed by the FTC suggests that one primary nutrient in the environmental “multi-vitamin” was Vitamin D — for Deception.
Following a public comment period, the Federal Trade Commission has approved final consent orders in three cases involving allegedly deceptive environmental claims for mattresses. The FTC’s complaints, first announced in July, 2013, against Relief-Mart, Inc.; Esssentia Natural Memory Foam Company...
The Green Guides were issued to help marketers ensure that the claims they are making are true and substantiated. The guidance they provide includes:

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