ANALYSIS OF PROPOSED CONSENT ORDER
TO AID PUBLIC COMMENT


The Federal Trade Commission ("Commission") has accepted, subject to public comment, an agreement containing a proposed Consent Order from Ceridian Corporation ("Ceridian"), which is designed to remedy the anticompetitive effects resulting from Ceridian's acquisitions of NTS Corporation and Trendar Corporation. Under the terms of the agreement, Ceridian will grant licenses to providers of truck stop fuel desk automation systems to process transactions originated by Ceridian's fleet cards, and will grant licenses to fleet card issuers to have their cards processed through Ceridian's Trendar fuel desk automation system.

The proposed Consent Order has been placed on the public record for sixty (60) days for reception of comments by interested persons. Comments received during this period will become part of the public record. After sixty (60) days, the Commission will again review the proposed Consent Order and the comments received, and will decide whether it should withdraw from the proposed Consent Order or make final the proposed Order.

Pursuant to an asset exchange agreement executed in January, 1998, Ceridian, through its wholly owned subsidiary Comdata Network, Inc. ("Comdata"), acquired substantially all of the assets of NTS. In March, 1995, Comdata Holdings Corporation, a subsidiary of Ceridian, acquired Trendar Corporation. Because the price of Trendar was below $15 million, it was not reportable under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act. The proposed Complaint alleges that these two acquisitions violated Section 7 of the Clayton Act, as amended, 15 U.S.C. 18, and Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act, as amended, 15 U.S.C. 45, in the market for the provision of fleet card services to over-the-road trucking companies and the market for truck stop fuel desk automation systems.

Fleet Card Services for Over-the-Road Trucking Companies

The services provided by fleet card issuers are of critical importance to over-the-road trucking companies. Fleet cards physically resemble traditional credit cards in that they are plastic laminated cards with embossed numbers on the front and a magnetic stripe on the back. Fleet cards are similar to traditional credit cards in that they provide a means by which cardholders can make purchases at retail locations that accept the card. Fleet cards issued on behalf of trucking companies provide additional services that go beyond the capabilities of traditional credit cards, allowing trucking companies to control the type, volume and frequency of their drivers' purchases, and capture important information relating to the transactions, such as drivers' odometer readings and vehicle identification numbers. Because of the specialized features of these fleet cards, traditional credit cards and other types of fleet cards are not acceptable substitutes. Comdata is the largest provider of fleet card services to over-the-road trucking companies in the United States. At the time Ceridian acquired NTS, NTS and Comdata were substantial, actual competitors in that market.

Fuel Purchase Desk Automation Systems

Fuel purchase desk automation systems are the means by which most truck stops process fleet card transactions. Fuel purchase desk automation systems used by truck stops can process multiple card issuers' fleet cards with a single device, thereby minimizing the physical space truck stops must allocate to point of sale ("POS") equipment and the training required for fuel purchase desk attendants. Such systems report transactions data and other information to the fleet card issuer, process the approval or rejections of requested transactions, and interface with fueling pumps. Comdata's fuel purchase desk automation system, Trendar, is the dominant means by which truck stops process fleet card transactions.

Fleet cards and fuel purchase desk automation systems are complementary products, and both products exhibit strong network effects. Demand for a fleet card rises with the number of truck stops that accept the card, which in turn depends on the number of fuel purchase desk automation systems that accept the card. Similarly, demand for a fuel purchase desk automation system rises with the number of fleet cards that can use the system. Effective entry into either market alleged in the complaint would be difficult, time consuming and unlikely to be successful without access to a substantial portion of the other market.

Effects of the Acquisitions

The acquisitions of NTS and Trendar resulted in Comdata's having a dominant position in both the fleet card services market and the fuel purchase desk automation systems market. In addition, the acquisitions raised barriers to entry in both markets, because effective entry into either market now requires Comdata's acquiescence. In the absence of the two acquisitions, Comdata would have had strong incentives to ensure that its fleet card was accepted on as many fuel purchase desk automation systems as possible, and Trendar would have maximized its value by accepting as many fleet cards as possible. With the acquisitions, however, these incentives became skewed: Comdata now must consider the impact on its Trendar system of allowing a competing fuel purchase desk automation system to process its card, and the impact on its fleet card business of allowing a rival fleet card to be processed on the Trendar system.

The market for the provision of fleet card services for over-the-road trucking companies is highly concentrated. Comdata controls the majority of that market and, with its acquisition of NTS, is more than five times larger than its nearest competitor. At the time of its acquisition, NTS was Comdata's closest competitor in the market for fleet card services for over-the-road trucking companies. The market for fuel purchase desk automation systems is also highly concentrated. At the time of its acquisition by Comdata, Trendar was the leading supplier of truck stop fuel purchase desk automation systems in the United States. Trendar remains the nation's leading supplier of truck stop fuel purchase desk automation systems.

Ceridian's acquisitions of NTS and Trendar have given Comdata the power to control new entry into, and expansion by incumbent providers in, both the market for the provision of fleet card services to over-the-road trucking companies and the market for truck stop fuel purchase desk automation systems. By acquiring Trendar, Comdata gained control of the predominant means by which fleet cards are processed by truck stops. Comdata therefore has the ability to preclude or delay new entry into the fleet card market, and to discipline or disadvantage new entrants or incumbent providers of fleet cards who seek to compete effectively with Comdata, by denying them access to Trendar's POS system or by granting access only on discriminatory terms. The investigation revealed evidence that Comdata has delayed or denied some fleet card competitors access to Trendar and Comdata has increased the fees to other firms for Trendar access. Similarly, by acquiring NTS, Comdata enhanced its control over the means by which over-the-road trucking companies purchase fuel.

In addition, both acquisitions increased the difficulty of entry into the fuel purchase desk automated system market. Comdata can defend Trendar's dominant position in that market by denying new entrants access to the fleet card protocols needed to process Comdata and NTS cards, or by granting access only on discriminatory terms. The investigation revealed evidence that Comdata has sought to impede entry. Given Comdata's dominance in the fleet card market, truck stop operators are unlikely to accept a POS system that cannot process Comdata's fleet cards. Because of the complementary nature of the fleet card and fuel purchase desk automation systems products, a new entrant that is unable to secure access to Comdata's products would have to enter both markets simultaneously. Such entry would be time consuming and costly, and is much less likely to be successful.

The Proposed Consent Order

While litigation with a goal of forcing the divestiture of NTS and Trendar was an alternative considered by the Commission, the proposed Consent Order effectively remedies the competitive effects of the two acquisitions without the delay and expenditure of resources that would be incurred with litigation. The proposed Consent Order requires Ceridian to grant fleet card issuers access to Comdata's Trendar fuel purchase desk automation system, and to grant fuel purchase desk automation systems suppliers the right to process Comdata's fleet cards. While access to the Trendar network and the NTS card could also have been accomplished through divestiture, the Commission concluded that divestiture was not necessary to resolve the competitive concerns raised by the two transactions, in part because numerous firms have indicated that they intend to take advantage of the terms of the proposed Consent Order to enter or expand their presence in the two markets.

In order to remedy the concerns in the fleet card services market, the Consent Order requires Comdata, for a period of three years, to grant a ten-year license to effect transactions on the Trendar system to any company providing, or seeking to provide, fleet card services. The order requires Comdata to refer any requests for such a license to a third-party developer approved by the Commission, that will perform all programming or other services necessary to enable the licensee to process transactions on the Trendar system. Once such programming services are completed by the third-party developer, Comdata is required to promptly disseminate the software to all truck stops on the Trendar network. Comdata is further required to provide licensees with equal access to any upgrades or modifications to the Trendar system, and is prohibited from basing any transaction fees charged to truck stops for processing the Comdata card, as well as access to the Comdata card, on whether such truck stops accept any other firm's fleet cards.

In order to remedy concerns in the fuel purchase desk automation systems market, the Consent Order requires Comdata, for a period of three years, to grant a ten-year license to all incumbent suppliers of fuel purchase desk automation systems, and to the first three new system providers that request a license. The license awarded to new system providers shall be transferrable, ensuring that if a better positioned entrant emerges in the future, it will be able to acquire a license.

In order to qualify for a license, new system providers must meet certain established criteria. Under the Consent Order, Comdata is required to promptly provide all licensees with all information or assistance necessary to enable the licensee to effect Comdata card transactions in a manner comparable to the way in which those transactions are processed on the Trendar system. The Order permits Comdata to certify that a licensee's system is capable of processing Comdata card transactions using criteria set forth in the Consent Order, and, if Comdata denies such certification, it must provide a complete enumeration for the reasons for such denial. The Order further requires Comdata to grant licensees complete and equal access to all Comdata card functions, upgrades and new developments. Finally, the Order provides that Comdata may not discriminate against any supplier of fuel purchase desk automation systems by charging transaction fees to truck stops that are based on which fuel purchase desk automation system the truck stop uses.

The Consent Order contains additional provisions that are designed to prevent the flow of confidential information obtained from Comdata's competitors between Comdata's fleet card and fuel purchase desk automation system businesses. Under the Order, Comdata is prohibited from providing any non-public information obtained from fuel purchase desk automation system providers to its Trendar business. Likewise, the Order prohibits Comdata from providing any non-public information obtained from fleet card issuers to its Comdata card business.

In order to ensure Comdata's compliance with the terms of the Order, the Commission is allowed to appoint a trustee to monitor any disputes, claims or controversies arising under the Order. The order specifically permits the monitor-trustee to prepare a report for the Commission relating to any failure by Comdata to certify either a fuel purchase desk automation system or a new fleet card and any failure by the third-party developer to provide programming and certification services to fleet card issuers in a timely manner. The trustee is also permitted, where appropriate, to report to the Commission regarding Ceridian's compliance with the Order.

The purpose of this analysis is to facilitate public comment on the proposed Order, and it is not intended to constitute an official interpretation of the agreement and proposed Order or to modify their terms in any way.