FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00849

Submission Number:
539814-00849
Commenter:
Gary Petersen
Organization:
Command Computer Consulting
State:
CA
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

Digital Restrictions (DRM) frustrate my customers. They buy music on Itunes and want to transfer it to their laptop but it only plays on their desktop. If they try to sync their Iphone to both the laptop and the desktop, it gives errors. They can't just copy the files over as they won't play unless they learn how to authorize the songs they've already purchased. They can't take songs they bought and put them as ringtones on their other phones. They're confused why they buy music but still can't listen to it on their different devices without hassles. When I tell them its a purposeful limitation, they're just annoyed as I have been since the start. I have bought Microsoft Windows and other Microsoft products and after a few installs, I have to call up MIcrosoft and get permission to reinstall the product on another computer. What happens to this product that I own when Microsoft stops supporting it such as they're threatening to do with XP? Do I lose the product I bought? Will they still be kind enough to let me use the product I paid for? There should be no DRM on retail purchases. If I buy Windows, it should run as long as I choose to run it. If Microsoft wants to lease me a copy, then sell it as a lease, not a retail sale. If they want control over installed copies, then they can have me sign up for update services like the Antivirus companies do. If I buy music, I should be able to listen to it in my car, my house, on my computer, and on my phone. Restricting it so I can't do this is just propping up a dead business model of greed and corruption. Its time to stop it. Already the first inroads are being seen but still, it should be LEGAL to do this and not allowed by the grace of the recording industry.