FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00829

Submission Number:
539814-00829
Commenter:
Michael Soldwisch
State:
CO
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

DRM software limits the consumer's options in purchases while hackers are able to easily remove every DRM ever released and continue using pirated data at their leisure. These measures only hurt the honest consumer who doesn't use hacks or cracks. - DRM does not stop or slow down piracy, look at the PC game Spore. I can obtain an illegal copy DRM-free within a couple hour download. If I purchase the game, I have to deal with DRM issues that range from the small "I can only install this on a couple computers" to the more extreme "my CD-ROM drive won't read the disc because of the DRM". - I completely understand the desire to protect intellectual property. If there is no protection at all, many people won't earn the money they've worked very hard for, and in the future others won't step up if they feel it would just be stolen. DRM software makes a developer or producer "feel better" but that's all it does. It makes the consumer infuriated and if possible they will obtain your software DRM-free (read illegally). - As for DRM in music files, I think the majority of the music world has figured out it doesn't work. With all of Itunes plus giving their music DRM free now, you can see the sales climb. The first time I purchased a digital music download I was unable to burn it to a CD to listen to in my car. I was also unable to play it in one of my favorite games that uses music - Audiosurf. - I didn't buy another piece of music until they offered it DRM-free. I now buy Itunes music regularly. I can feel comfortable that the music will play in any device I choose, and that leads to more purchases.