FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00793

Submission Number:
539814-00793
Commenter:
Patrick Gonet
Organization:
N/A
State:
GA
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

As an electrical engineer and professional in the software industry for the past several years, I have evaluated digital rights management carefully. ---------------------------------------------------------- The unreasonable limitations (you can't play the legally purchased media where you want, when you want, how you want, even though you bought it) delay the development of new methods of content distribution and consumption. They are bad for innovation, bad for citizens, and bad for the country's economy. ---------------------------------------------------------- Over the past several years I have heard time and time again from colleagues and strangers alike that DRM has become so restrictive, and demanding that it is, in almost all cases not only easier, but also safer for the consumer to PIRATE their media than purchase it legally. ---------------------------------------------------------- Sony's XCP is the most heinous and well known example. XCP was a root kit (a sort of open door for viruses) that Sony CDs installed automatically without warning the user. It was intended as a method of DRM, but instead it served as a perfect platform for malicious attacks on netowrks across the globe. Not only did it compromise the computers of thousands of innocent and law abiding Americans, but it also created severe security risks across many of the secured networks used by the Department of Defense. ---------------------------------------------------------- DRM, wielded as a tool to allow price fixing and collusion on the part of the major content distributors, has created a war between consumers and content publishers, and needs to be suppressed so that the market that balance itself out. DRM is bad for business, and bad for citizens.