FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00791

Submission Number:
539814-00791
Commenter:
Mark Boyd
State:
CA
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

DRM is pretty simple for me. If any media comes bundled with DRM, I will not purchase it. Period. None of my music CDs have DRM on them. I purchased most of my music CDs in the 80s and early 90s. Since then I purchase individual pieces of music online from garage bands with creative commons licenses. I'm usually happy to pay a buck a song. None of my written materials have DRM on them. Either I purchase paperback books and magazines, or I download from publishers that use creative commons licenses, or I get it from Project Gutenberg or Manybooks.net. A lot of my movies DO have DRM on the DVDs - but since I built my own TIVO, I'll be stopping that too. If I can't archive all of my movies on my home server, available at the push of a button, then I don't want them. It's really very simple. If I buy something, then I own it. This means I can read or watch it anywhere, on any piece of equipment that I own for that purpose. This means I can loan it to a friend. This means I can sell it at my next garage sale. This means I can destroy it, tear it up, repair it, or combine it in ways the original creators never thought about. I can read a book, trade it, sell it, lend it, or tear it into pieces, mix it with glue and turn it into a pinata. Unless I am able to do the equivalent with a purchased bit of media (song, movie, book or video game) I can not truly say that I really own it - no matter how much I've paid for it. And if I can't own it, then I refuse to pay for it. I won't risk the possibility of a DRM licensing server crash rendering my entire library useless. As far as I care, the providers of DRM-locked media can go to Hell without any of my money. There's plenty of open source software and creative commons works to replace DRM material. This should scare traditional media providers. Open source software has already surpassed commercial software in quantity and quality, and creative commons media is fast catching up to traditional media too. Media providers have to heed this warning - they have to change before they become irrelevant and extinct. Sincerely Mark Boyd