FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00667

Submission Number:
539814-00667
Commenter:
Demski
State:
CA
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

Seeing as I have a huge vested interest in Computer Gaming, as this is my chosen hobby, I feel it worthy to offer a few small tidbits to the "anti-DRM" movement, as it were. Trying to keep this short and concise, I have a couple minor points to bring up. There is nothing innately wrong with a person, company or any other body of people to desire to protect their electronic properties. If I made any of these products, I would desire to protect them as well. However, there is something wrong when the DRM both has to be installed separately from the main product, cannot be uninstalled even if the main product is removed except with advanced knowledge of how computers work, and it can interrupt the stability of my computer as well as deny my computer the ability to use other legally owned products. My main comment can be summed up with this line however. Some DRM are so invasive to people and their computers that there are known cases of people having to acquire pirated copies of products they -legally own- just so they can play it, because the DRM literally isn't recognizing that it is a legal copy despite them having a boxed copy, a receipt, a legal disc and any other forms of authentication required. There are far better ways to protect your product than to -inconvenience customers- this severely, to the point that pirates are quite literally getting a better product since they don't have to deal with hidden DRM installs that destabilize computers. A few examples of better ways. Stardock has successfully employed a "no DRM on the disc, program" system, but requiring you to have a legal copy VIA cd key and use their download utility Impulse to download any patches for any of their products. You don't need to authorize the copy, some products (Galactic Civilizations II) don't even require a CD-Key to install the game, just to acquire patches from their own download utility. Additionally, you do not need the CD to play the product after it is installed. http://stardock.com/ My main complaint is, why are companies like Electronic Arts literally treating consumers like criminals with invasive DRM systems like Securom? This is how I feel on the matter.