FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00560

Submission Number:
539814-00560
Commenter:
Brad Venable
State:
OK
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

DRM has not been a problem until it starts scanning my PC for any programs that are on its 'blacklist.' If a program embedded in the game that I purchase scans my computer for software it doesn't 'like,' then the company that publishes the game is trying to tell me what I can and cannot have installed on my PC. That is a violation of my civil rights and so many ethics codes that I literally don't know where to begin. If DRM is limited to checking to see if I have a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM in the optical drive, wonderful. But the day that I let a company have the right to tell me what I can have installed on my machine is the day that my rights have been spat upon and tossed aside. The other thing that really disturbs me is the propaganda that software publishers, movie studios and other venture capital-like companies use to deter regular law-abiding citizens from the evils of stealing movies, music, and software. A prime example of a lie perpetuated to captive audiences was the "PSA" shown in theaters of a regular Joe painter that worked on a movie set, painting backdrops and the like. In this message, he talked about how people pirating movies took money out of his pocket, and not to post movies on the internet so he could feed his family. That is a blatant lie in the direct sense. That man does the job he is hired to do, he gets paid. That contractor does not see another dime in residual payments after the movie is released, unlike the actors. I think that business practices of invasion of privacy and false or misleading messages are the kind of behavior that warrants examination.