FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00552

Submission Number:
539814-00552
Commenter:
Lance Larka
Organization:
Oblique Automation Solutions, LLC
State:
AL
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

I fully support artists and game companies having their work protected from theft. However, current trends in DRM are ineffective, intrusive, and damaging to my property. Nor are they required to ensure a successful product launch and sale. Systems that check for the presence of the CD or DVD are typically circumvented within days of a product being released. Systems that use a monitoring service such as SECURErom add intrusive applications to my computer without telling me. These applications frequently conflict with other applications I use. They are also circumvented within days of release. Systems that allow only a certain number of installs per serial number restrict my ability to upgrade to a new computer. They are also circumvented within days of release. Thus the only people that DRM really affect are the legitimate customer who does not use pirated copies. The thieves just ignore the DRM altogether. Last year a small game company released "Sins of a Solar Empire" with no DRM. Further they released a digital download version of the game. If piracy was so bad this would be a recipe for disaster. A non-protected game already packaged in a form that could be distributed illegally upon release. What really happened was that they released such a good product that legitimate customers broke all records for number of units actually sold. Hundreds of thousands of copies legitimately sold. By all measures it was a blockbuster release. The sad truth is that most games released are buggy, poorly designed, and badly implemented. Poor sales of these products are frequently blamed on piracy instead of acknowledging that it was simply a bad product. Pirates don't play bad products any more than honest consumers. I will support any system that actually protects property, including mine. The game I buy is that property just as much as the work that went into it is the property of the publisher. Both parties must be protected equally. That is not happening right now. Thank you for asking for input on this very important issue. Lance Larka