FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00445

Submission Number:
539814-00445
Commenter:
Bradford Williams
State:
VT
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

Honestly, I understand why developers want a form of DRM involved in their games, movies, and other media. The problem I have is that every form of DRM is in some way either detrimental to the rights of the consumer, or actually obtrusive. DRM schemes cause the item in question to no longer be copyable, meaning the consumers' right to make a backup is infringed upon. Further, because of the DMCA, the consumer is not allowed to bypass the copy protection, essentially making something that is legal (as defined by law) illegal. There are a couple of other problems, as well. Items with a limited number of activations cause a serious problem, as with the proliferation of spyware, viruses, and other issues, computers may need to be formatted and reloaded often. Each time this is done, an "activation" is used up, eventually causing the consumer to no longer be able to use the product they have paid for. Additionally, because of these activations (and other issues with DRM), consumers are often denied their right of first sale - used software is oven completely non-transferrable. When everything is said and done, DRM is a hassle for the honest customer. The irony is that most of the DRM in software is very easy to remove by way of hacks, so the supposed targets of DRM software (pirates) aren't effected in the slightest.