FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00426

Submission Number:
539814-00426
Commenter:
Armand Minotti
State:
Outside the United States
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

Current DRM standards treat legitimate consumers as criminals. The most famous DRM fiasco of this year was EA's Spore. It's DRM limited installs and users on a game certain to be played by families and perhaps on more than one household PC. As it is, if a family has three children, and each child wants their own unique profile, three separate copies of the game must be purchased. Meanwhile, DRM does nothing to slow down those who would illegally obtain the game. Spore was the most pirated game of 2008 by a large margin despite its draconian DRM. As it is, DRM is something there to assure the investors that the company distributing a product is doing something to stave off piracy. However, DRM has been proven time and again to harm legitimate customers and do nothing to stop pirates. It is pointless, harmful (I haven't even gotten into some of the unremoveable software many DRM solutions leave on your PC), and a general blight on the new age of digital distribution.