FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00386

Submission Number:
539814-00386
Commenter:
Jason Frenz
Organization:
Student of the Ohio State University
State:
OH
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

The biggest issue with DRM is that it does not work, anyone with only limited knowledge of computers, and how they function, can bypass simple DRM and even the most complex ones can be bypassed in an hour or two by anyone who has taken college level Computer Science courses. the people who "crack" the software then release easy to use .exe files to allow majority of other PC users to also be able to bypass it. Modern DRM does not accomplish it's intended goal and does not act in good faith in the assumption that something is bought is then owned by that person, which is blatantly apparent in the "end user agreement" that no rational person would read in its entirety. DRM, especially the type that limit install totals, only hurt the people who bought the software legally as anyone who obtained it illegally has essentially no interaction with it. Also such "draconian DRM" (ex SecureROM) has cause people to protest certain software by specifically pirating that software (big example would be the recent game release by EA "Spore"). If DRM was almost totally eliminated, or complete changed from its current form, only the only people who would benefit are the legal consumer and make no difference to the people who pirate the software, since the inconvenience of 1 person for say 2 hours or so it take to crack a DRM scheme is so irrelevantly small of a hindrance to the some 1 million who then pirate the software after it is cracked. DRM is not a deterrent and only hurts the legal purchasers.