FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00356

Submission Number:
539814-00356
Commenter:
Aaron Campbell
State:
Outside the United States
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

Hello. I have experience as both a consumer and (formerly) a pirate of software. I have to say that the DRM measures used today do nothing to stop piracy, but do a lot to harm paying consumers. Regardless of what DRM is used, most softwares will appear in cracked (DRM-free) form on every file share site within hours of first falling into the hands of the public. On the other hand, people who purchase software that uses DRM often have their experience with it diminished. I've had applications refuse to run because the DRM no longer recognized my machine due to a piece of hardware I just installed. I've had games run poorly and crash because of DRM - because of this, I actually download cracked copies of every PC game I purchase, as ludicrous as that sounds. Finally, games with DRM often have no resale value because they cannot easily or reliably be installed and run on another person's computer. Because DRM does not prevent piracy - which many game producers are well aware - but does prevent resale, one wonders if preventing paying customers from being able to re-sell their games when they're done with them is the intended effect. So in conclusion, software DRM - in particular, computer games DRM - is a disservice to customers as well as accomplishing nothing to prevent actual piracy. It's a colossal waste of everyone's time and something should be done about it.