FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00329

Submission Number:
539814-00329
Commenter:
Joseph Hatcher
State:
CA
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

While some can see the value of protecting IPs once they are out in the wild, so that the creator can make money off of his works, other people simply see that zeros and ones are just that, data. Those others view that data is free, all info is free. It is hard to fight that mindset. Some things that help contribute to this mindset are high prices for physical media, and similar prices for the media in digital/download form. Music CDs should not cost more then $10 retail. DVD AND Blu-ray movies should not cost more then $20 retail. Video games should not cost more then $40 retail. Their digital counterparts should be discounted enough to be a good value, but not hardcopy retail form. Consumers feel cheated because of this, and it helps push people toward piracy. One way around this is to monetize data with ads, like over the air TV has done for decades. People are use to getting TV and radio for free. As they make the transition to more advanced electronics, this same mindset carries over. DRM technologies hinder what consumers can do with their own media, and angers everyone else. DRM is NOT effective past a few days, a few weeks at maximum. If IP creators think: "yeah, but we can make the most money in the first few days before its cracked", then they know their product is of low enough quality, that after a few days, word will get around about how low quality their product is. It is a fine balance between making something worth buying to people who can get it for free, and selling a low quality product in a small time window at high prices. Think of it as the battle for over the air TV versus cable or satellite. Same delivery methods, similar products, but different features and prices. More research should be done directly with consumers, and the creators of IPs to help establish some guidelines to help offset piracy. It comes down to price, convenience, quality, and the ways the user can use what they have purchased. Trying to control what consumers can do with something once they buy it is pointless. Work within the limits given, and grow from there. Good day.