FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00260

Submission Number:
539814-00260
Commenter:
Manning
State:
NY
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

If I buy a book, I can lend it to a friend to read. A book is a creative work, just like a video game or an mp3 or any other work. I should be able to lend that to my friend as well. I understand stopping the making of copies and distribution of copies, however, when I buy something, I expect to own it. When I have my book, I have control of it. There will always be people who may photocopy the book and distribute it, but there will also always be bad apples and criminals. We're human, after all. And making it harder to simply use an item in an expected way just doesn't make logical sense. DRM, in effect, is the same as when there was one trouble maker in an elementary school class and causes the teacher to punish the whole class. The idea is that then there is added pressure on the trouble maker to conform. It didn't work in elementary school, and it doesn't work now. Especially when there is no pressure being created from the behaving people on the troublemakers. Finally, DRM costs the companies who use it money. Plain and simple. They focus on trying to not lose money instead of making more money. The best way to lose is to try not to lose, the best way to win is to try to win. Companies are spending valuable resources on things that simply constrict a customer and creates a public relations and customer service nightmare. It has gone past the point of diminishing returns. If you build a security system to your house to keep people out, the determined people will still get in. If someone wants to devote enough time and resources, they will get in, regardless of your security.