FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00179

Submission Number:
539814-00179
Commenter:
Andrew Schnellback
Organization:
Student
State:
Outside the United States
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

Ive been paying attention to the constant back and forth between DRM using companies, the consumers who find themselves not able to play their games and the game pirates who seem to easily bypass all the DRM techniques there are to date. My one friend recently purchased a game that I also purchased, the game is Battlefield 2 from Electronic Arts and DICE. He bought his copy from the Wal-Mart in our town and when he went to install the game it asked for his CD key and it worked fine. He then went to install the expansion packs that came with the "Complete Collection" but it said that his registration code was already used up. The game was brand new and still in the protective sealing straight from Wal-Mart, when he contacted EA for support they simply told him to purchase a new registration key. Why should he be forced to pay an additional fee that would not have occurred if not for the DRM placed on the expansion packs? Another instance I have is that another friend of mine and my self both purchased the game "Command & Conquer: Red Alert 3" on the release date, my friend has a Laptop so he brought it with him so he could play the game on the way back to town, however when he went to install the game it would not let him as the game requires internet access to be authorized to play the game. (we pre-ordered this game at an Electronics Boutique Canada in the nearby city of Nanimo) All these protective measures I can understand, pirates are stealing games on a large scale. But if we take a look at recent games where DRM was applied heavily and in the most advanced ways currently possible such as EA's "Spore", the game was available for illegal download from the pirate's within a week of release *and that the illegal version even had more benefits than the official version such as being able to have more than one save file per purchased copy and also became the most pirated game of the year with over 1 million downloads within two months of the launch date. Why do we the paying consumers have to face the consequences for what the pirates are doing to the industry when the consequences we face are not even effecting the pirates in the least bit? *according to various news sites.