FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00148

Submission Number:
539814-00148
Commenter:
Zachariah Gonzalez-Belenki
State:
NY
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

There is little to be said about Digital Rights Management except that it rarely works as it's supposed to. When it does work, it can only prevent you from using your paid for items as you want to- copying a song as many times as you want, for example. This shouldn't be allowed in the first place, but I suppose if you sign a paper saying you won't, then you shouldn't. But it doesn't always work. I hear more stories of Digital Rights Management software preventing people from using their paid-for and legally purchased computer games, music, and software than of DRM working seamlessly. DRM can often shut down certain programs from running, simply because it recognizes them as pirating software- which isn't always the case. Also, DRM so far hasn't stopped piracy from working. Pirated copies of the game Spore (whose DRM sparked huge debates) were available on the day that it was released. In short, if DRM did what it was supposed to with no fuss, then the argument would be a moral one- "How much can you watch me?". But DRM doesn't work like it should, it's highly noticeable, and it can often interfere with the running of your electronics. As such, it shouldn't be used at all.