FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00142

Submission Number:
539814-00142
Commenter:
Skyler Hawthorne
State:
CA
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

I am of the strong opinion that the Digital Rights Management used by publishers, such as EA, is in strong need of removal--or at the very least, revisal--from video games sold to the public. Measures such as SecuROM, which limit the number of installations allowed per copy, effectively turn the physical material purchased into a temporary ownership. Situations will always arise in which games will need to be installed several times on the same machine, such as a hard drive reformat, or data corruption. Also, a recent DRM measure has been the requirement of an internet connection to activate the game. I cannot stress enough that it is simply ludicrous to require an internet connection to be allowed to play a game that does not require an internet connection for the actual gameplay. Besides the points above, all of these measures prove to be fruitless anyway. It has been shown repeatedly that DRM does nothing to stop piracy. Games are always cracked within days, if not hours, of their release. And so the pirates, whom they implement this DRM software to stop, get a better, DRM-free verison of the game--and they didn't even pay for it. In short, the present DRM measures have proven with each and every new game release to be completely useless in terms of what they're actually supposed to accomplish--stop piracy--and so do nothing more than create an unnecessary difficulty for the legitimate owners.