FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle #539814-00043

Submission Number:
539814-00043
Commenter:
Greg London
State:
MA
Initiative Name:
FTC Town Hall to Address Digital Rights Management Technologies - Event Takes Place Wednesday, March 25, 2009, in Seattle

http://www.greglondon.com/bountyhunters/index.htm ....... The book addresses the issues around copyright. Specific issues around DRM (and the DMCA that enforces anti-circumvention of DRM) start at the section labeled: ....... "3.6 Digital Millennium Copyright Act" ....... The main issue with DRM is that it allows the author/distributer/publisher to use technological measures to enforce more rights than the author/distributer/publisher legally has according to copyright law. ....... If the author/distributer/publisher wants to prohibit the public from Fair Use rights, they can do so using the technological restrictions available from DRM. ...... If the author/distributer/publisher decides that the user can only have one working copy of a song, they can enforce that with DRM. If the author/distributer/publisher decides that the user will not be allowed to copy a work to timeshift it, they can enforce that with DRM. ...... The DRM on DVD's actually prohibits someone from playing a legally owned copy of their DVD on anything other than "approved" hardware. People with Linux based computers, for example, have hardware that would allow them to read DVD's in their drives and play them on their computers. In 1999, a Norwegian teenager named Jon Johansen reverse engineered the encryption on a DVD player he bought so that he could play DVD's on his Linux computer system. He was arrested and DVD Jon became infamous in the linux world for the court battles that law enforcement agencies were bringing against him. ...... Whoever controls DRM is essentially granted patent-like powers. No one can build a DRM player except the people approved by the DRM controlling group. Patents grant the exclusive right to manufacture a device if the device is a new innovation. Patents last 20 years, and then anyone can manufacture that device. ...... DRM grants exclusive manufacturing rights to whoever controls the DRM. And the rights last forever, because the legal protections of DRM do not expire. ...... Secondary issue is that DRM is always technologically based, and technology changes. So, while you may have a vinyl record you bought 30 years ago that you can still play on your turntable, your DRM-enforced files may stop working the next time you have to upgrade your operating system, the next time you buy a new computer, the next time you buy new computer hardware. .....