Preliminary Proposed Nutrition Principles to Guide Industry Self-Regulatory Efforts, Project No. P094513 #00180

Submission Number:
00180
Commenter:
Tatia Johnson
State:
Maryland
Initiative Name:
Preliminary Proposed Nutrition Principles to Guide Industry Self-Regulatory Efforts, Project No. P094513

Dear FTC Members: I definitely believe that there should be some "policing" of the food-related ads geared to children. I have been able to see direct effects of what manufacturers have gotten away with over the last 3 (or so) decades, not only as a healthcare provider of more than 12years, but also as a mother to a 6-year old boy. When I was in elementary school (in the 1970's)there was only a handful of children considered to be overweight, and even fewer who actually met the criteria for Obesity. Over the past 20+ years, there has been a huge increase in "chubby" kids. Yes, parents can make the choice to NOT purchase these items, but let's face it, sometimes it's easier for parents to give in to the child (and even sometimes more convenient than preparing a healthy snack that might need to be washed, cut up, etc. Lower socioeconomic groups have sometimes more of a dilemma because the healthy food tends to be more expensive, AND you don't get as "much". For instance, 3 apples may cost >5$, so getting a pack of 10 Pop-Tarts seems more feasible since for $4, that package will likely last a few more days than 3 apples might. Adults know there are ploys in advertising, but kids do not-- they are innocent and take everything at face-value. I could go on and on, but trying to touch on main points to get my opinion understood. Thank you.