16 CFR Part 423: Trade Regulation Rule on Care Labeling of Textile Wearing Apparel and Certain Piece Goods, FTC Project No. R511915 #00092 

Submission Number:
00092 
Commenter:
Steve Chambers
Organization:
Chambers Cleaners, Inc.
State:
Georgia
Initiative Name:
16 CFR Part 423: Trade Regulation Rule on Care Labeling of Textile Wearing Apparel and Certain Piece Goods, FTC Project No. R511915

Time is money in any industry and especially true in this recessionary period. I am a 2nd generation dry cleaner with 34 years experience. I am very active, being a member of the Drycleaning and Laundry Institute and on a regional basis, a past president and current chairman of the board for the South Eastern Fabricare Association. Care labels are an integral part of our daily work. Without them, our industry is faced with a guessing game that can be very costly. Care labels hold a manufacturer's proverbial "feet to the fire' in that it must conduct some type of research toward suggesting care for the garment for the benefit of the consumer or the "care taker", the dry cleaner. Explicit directions, whether spelled out or in symbol form or both is essential for the consumer because it details whether or not a consumer can care for the garment at home or should seek professional help. In our dry cleaning and laundry plant, we look at each garment not only for stains but for the way(s)of care. Having to test each garment is costly and most of us right now are struggling just to make ends meet. Not holding the "feet to the fire" puts an undue and unjust extra cost of testing material on the enduser. With garments predominately being made outside of the USA and no way to contact manufacturers in other countries it becomes a guessing game. We are trying hard in my business to use water as an alternative cleaning medium and hopefully cutting down on the use of chemicals. In order to achieve this goal we must know the fiber content as well as whether or not the manufacturer suggests that alternatives other than dry cleaning can be used. There are now many other alternative fluids used in dry cleaning and keeping up with these changes is essential for the garment and cleaning industries. In closing, we live in an fast paced, ever changing world. Environmental impacts, consumer demand and local, state and federal regulations demand we as a dry cleaning industry keep up and stay ahead. The same should be expected out of garment manufacturers, both domestic and abroad. Thank you for allowing me to be heard. If you have any questions I can be reached by cell phone at or email at . Sincerely, Steve Chambers